Gunzburg spoke about the state of the Russians who arrived from South Africa with the “omicron”

Plot The spread of a new strain of coronavirus “omicron”

'There are no serious cases, they are in the hospital, but there is nothing serious about the clinic. Mild course: patients have previously been immunized '', '' mdash; he said.

The first two cases of infection with the & nbsp; omicron-strain & nbsp; were detected in the Russian Federation on December 6 among those who arrived from South Africa.

Earlier, in the center named after Gamaleya & nbsp; called & nbsp; irresponsible statements about & laquo; lightness '' omicron. Scientists recalled that there is no reliable data on the new version of the coronavirus yet.

The head of Rospotrebnadzor Anna Popova & nbsp; said that the exact & nbsp; information that the omicron strain of coronavirus will be less dangerous is not yet available. She added that vaccines to one degree or another protect against coronavirus, and data on whether, to a greater or lesser extent, they protect against the omicron strain, will soon appear.

Источник aif.ru

World leaders agree to help South Africa phase out coal

class=”MuiTypography-root-133 MuiTypography-h1-138″>World leaders agree to help South Africa phase out coal

At the recent COP26 climate talks in Scotland, the US and European nations agreed to provide $8.5 billion in financing to help South Africa phase out its use of coal power. 

Living on EarthNovember 29, 2021 · 2:00 PM EST

A coal-fired power station in Witbank, South Africa, Monday, Oct. 11, 2021.
 

Themba Hadebe/AP

The United States and several European nations have agreed to provide $8.5 billion dollars to help South Africa phase out its use of coal.

More than 80% of South Africa’s electricity comes from coal, making it the largest carbon emitter in Africa.

Eskom, the state utility company that provides more than 90% of the electricity used in South Africa, is currently drowning in more than $27 billion of debt and, as a result, can’t generate power consistently to its customers.

The national power grid in South Africa is simply not working, says Jesse Burton, a senior associate with the think tank E3G, which provides analysis and advice for socially just coal transitions in South Africa and globally.

“[S]outh Africa is incredibly coal dependent. We get about 87% of our electricity from coal-fired power plants…"

Jesse Burton, senior associate, E3G

“We're facing something called ‘load shedding’… which really just means Eskom is not meeting demand,” Burton explains. “[S]outh Africa is incredibly coal dependent. We get about 87% of our electricity from coal-fired power plants; a little bit, about 5%, from wind and solar; and a small contribution from nuclear and hydro and some imports.”

Two new power plants that Eskom is building are not working well and at the same time, the rest of its plants are very old, Burton says.

“[It’s] kind of similar to the US in many ways,” she notes. “A lot of the plants were built in the '60s and '70s and '80s and they haven't been maintained very well and they're kind of falling over, like an old car that you haven't maintained.”

RelatedChina, top global emitter, aims to go carbon-neutral by 2060

Paradoxically, coal has been the backbone of development in South Africa, Burton notes. Cheap electricity "created the basis for all the industry in the country. At the same time, it's been accompanied by this deep environmental injustice," she says.

Most of the coal mines and the coal plants are located within a 62-mile radius in a province called Mpumalanga. The regions suffers from severe air and water pollution problems. The most polluted river catchment in the country, the Olifants catchment, runs through the mining areas and the air contains “extraordinarily high levels of particulates,” in addition to high levels of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides, Burton notes.

“The South African government's own health study…[concluded] that air pollution in Mpumalanga leads to the premature death of about 5,000 people per year."

Jesse Burton, senior associate, E3G

“The South African government's own health study, which was recently leaked — it wasn't even released, it was discovered through some litigation that civil society is undertaking to try and force the government to implement its own air pollution laws — [concluded] that air pollution in Mpumalanga leads to the premature death of about 5,000 people per year and [there is] twice as much asthma in the region as anywhere else,” Burton says. “So, it just comes with these enormous costs.”

RelatedFossil fuels cause 1 in 5 premature deaths worldwide, study says

There are also issues around degraded land, which impacts people's health. “We hear from activists on the ground that people who've grown up in the region who want to work in mining — because this is the only sector that has any growth in the area, in part because other sectors are put at risk by these kinds of impacts in health and water and air — are often too sick to pass the health tests that you need to pass to get into mining,” Burton says.

South Africa as a whole has incredibly high levels of unemployment, Burton notes — 45% unemployment throughout the country and slightly higher in Mpumalanga province itself. Unemployment rates are even worse among South Africa’s youth. “If you're a young Black woman, unemployment levels are almost 70%. So, it's incredibly difficult,” Burton says.

Which makes the pledges made by the US and a number or European countries at COP26 hugely important.

"I think this is a test case for seeing how coal-intensive developing countries — and there are a lot of them — can be supported in this way."

Jesse Burton, senior associate, E3G

“This is the first time a country-led, donor-supported process like this is going to unfold in this way. … I think this is a test case for seeing how coal-intensive developing countries — and there are a lot of them — can be supported in this way,” she explains. “It's fascinating to see because now we’re getting down to talking: What is it going to take to decarbonize the power sector or to get to that low NDC range en route to decarbonization? Well, it requires a huge build out of transmission infrastructure. We've got to build 40 gigawatts of wind and solar over the next decade. At the moment, we've only got six gigawatts installed, so it's a huge scale up.”

RelatedAmerica’s leading coal state looks to the wind

This “just energy transition partnership” is a way for developed countries to deliver on the support and financing they have for years been promising to developing countries, Burton adds.

“What made me very optimistic about it is that the political declaration very much centers just transition,” she says. “It acknowledges all of these constraints. It acknowledges that South Africa has an employment crisis, that looking after fossil fuel workers is important, that you have to look at the mining value chain and the communities in Mpumalanga.

"I feel quite inspired, actually. I hope it happens. Of course, we wanted to be ambitious, we want it to be transformational and we have to work to make that happen. It won't just happen automatically. But I think the runway is there to have a just transition in South Africa and that makes me really excited.”

This article is written by Adam Wernick, based on an interview that aired on Living on Earth from PRX.

Remembering the life and legacy of the late FW de Klerk, South Africa’s last apartheid president

class=”MuiTypography-root-133 MuiTypography-h1-138″>Remembering the life and legacy of the late FW de Klerk, South Africa's last apartheid president

Former South African President FW De Klerk has died at the age of 85. Dave Steward, chairman of the FW de Klerk Foundation, spoke with The World's host Marco Werman about the late president's life and legacy in South Africa.

The WorldNovember 11, 2021 · 3:45 PM EST

Former South African President FW de Klerk arrives for the swearing-in ceremony of newly elected President Cyril Ramaphosa in Pretoria, South Africa, May 25, 2019. 

Jerome Delay/AP/File 

On Thursday, FW de Klerk, the last president of apartheid South Africa, died at the age of 85.

The FW de Klerk Foundation issued a statement that the former president had been receiving treatment for cancer.

De Klerk was a white Afrikaner — a South African ethnic group descended from predominantly Dutch settlers who arrived in the 17th and 18th centuries. 

De Klerk came from a political family and throughout most of his career, he defended apartheid.

Related: Climate divestment activists draw inspiration from South Africa’s anti-apartheid struggle

That changed in 1990 after releasing anti-apartheid revolutionary Nelson Mandela from prison. He worked with Mandela to end racial segregation and apartheid in the country. For this achievement, both leaders were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993.

South African President FW de Klerk poses outside his office in Cape Town, South Africa March 18, 1992, while displaying a copy of a local newspaper with banner headlines declaring a "Yes" result in a referendum vote to end apartheid and share power with the Black majority for the first time. 

Credit:

AP

Dave Steward, chairman of the FW de Klerk Foundation, worked closely with President de Klerk over the years. Steward joined The World's host Marco Werman to talk about de Klerk's life and legacy. 

Marco Werman: Could we start with FW de Klerk's background? How did that shape his early politics? Dave Steward: Well, FW de Klerk was born into an Afrikaner nationalist family. His father was a prominent politician, and their goal was to reestablish an Afrikaner Republic in Africa. When he was born, the rest of Africa was under colonial domination. The United States — you had Jim Crow laws. It was a different universe. So, that's what he grew up with. And as he went into politics, he began to realize how impossible it was going to be to retain a right to Afrikan national self-determination in a country where Afrikaners were a diminishing minority.But for years, publicly, de Klerk defended apartheid. What argument did he use?Well, they were looking for some kind of solution that would allow all of the peoples of South Africa to have self-determination — but it was nonsense. And I think he began to realize that reform wasn't going to work. There had to be transformation, and de Klerk accepted that, and he dedicated his presidency to the abolition of apartheid. And when that idea came to de Klerk, why didn't he immediately say, "Let's just transform the whole system."Well, mainly because he would have been kicked out of office very quickly. The whole process of changing a society is fraught with difficulties. The real challenge is to persuade your support base to go along with a process that will inevitably undermine their position, and that was his great skill.

Related: Dozens killed in South Africa violence over Zuma imprisonment 

Later in life, de Klerk apologized for apartheid — including in this video that your foundation released: "I, without qualification, apologize for the pain and the hurt and the indignity and the damage that apartheid has done to Black, brown and Indians in South Africa." Mr. Steward, I have to ask you. That video was posted today, on YouTube. When did President de Klerk record that message? He recorded it about … six weeks ago. 

Related: South Africa’s democracy is ‘standing firm’ despite civil unrest, says analyst 

What was he feeling so close to the end that he felt necessary to repeat once again that apology for apartheid? Well, it's because that's the way he really felt about it. He really felt very bad about the enormous harm and damage and indignity that had been done to so many generations of nonwhite South Africans. So, he wanted to record that as part of his testament. 

 

As I think about de Klerk's words in his apology, the news today almost comes across the board, as de Klerk was the man who ended apartheid — but waited too long. Did you ever hear him reflect on that?I don't think he thought that he waited too long. History and politics moves at their own pace. If he tried to do in 1980 what he did in 1990, it just simply wouldn't have worked. He would have been kicked out of power very quickly. So the real challenge for statesmen as opposed to politicians is to watch the tide of history and to ride the wave when it breaks and to realize when it's going to break. And that's what de Klerk did. In fact, he has said that his greatest achievement was actually handing power over not to the ANC, not to President Mandela, but to a new, democratic constitutional system. So maybe that's how we will remember him.

This interview has been edited and condensed for clarity. 

Chinese Communist Party cements Xi Jinping’s rule

class=”MuiTypography-root-228 MuiTypography-h1-233″>Chinese Communist Party cements Xi Jinping’s ruleThe WorldNovember 11, 2021 · 11:00 AM EST

Portraits of China's former top leaders from left Mao Zedong, Deng Xiaoping, Jiang Zemin, Hu Jintao and including the current President Xi Jinping are seen at a military camp in Beijing, China, after Chinese leaders approve a resolution on the history of the ruling Communist Party, Nov. 11, 2021.

Ng Han Guan/AP

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

China
After a four-day, closed-door session of Chinese Communist Party senior officials, the country’s top leadership passed a resolution enshrining President Xi Jinping’s status in the country’s political history, while securing his political future. In only the third of such resolutions since the party’s founding, Central Committee members declared Xi’s ideology the “essence of Chinese culture,” establishing Xi as an equal to party founder Mao Zedong and his successor Deng Xiaoping. In 2018, the party removed Xi’s term limits. Then, officials told reporters Xi might need more time to assure economic and other reforms. Leadership changes will be announced at the Communist Party congress, likely to be held in 2022 when Xi is on track to secure a third five-year term, with no apparent rival.

South Africa
F.W. de Klerk, South Africa's last president of the apartheid era, has died after battling cancer at the age of 85. In 1990, de Klerk announced the release of Nelson Mandela from prison, which led to historic elections. He shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Mandela for helping to negotiate an end to apartheid. Opinions on de Klerk’s legacy are divided in South Africa. Many also blame him for violence against Black South Africans and anti-apartheid activists during his presidency.

Germany
COVID-19 cases have soared in Germany as the country battles its fourth wave of the virus, registering just over 50,000 cases a day, the highest since the pandemic began almost two years ago. Germany was once seen as an example of how to deal with the coronavirus, but current data has officials worried as the cold weather sets in. Reportedly, Chancellor Angela Merkel has called for an urgent meeting to discuss the country’s response to the crisis. Christian Drosten, a leading German virologist, has joined the call for action, warning that the country could see as many as 100,000 more deaths if nothing is done.

From The WorldDearborn's first Arab American mayor-elect: 'You need not change who you are' to run for public office

Abdullah Hammoud, mayor-elect of Dearborn, Michigan

Credit:

Abdullah H. Hammoud Facebook page

Dearborn, Michigan, has been a center for Arabic language, food and culture for decades. And last week, the city elected its first Arab American Muslim mayor, State Representative Abdullah Hammoud. "You're seeing minority populations and residents begin to really get involved in the political process," Hammoud told The World's host Marco Werman.

At COP26, island nations push hard for countries to meet goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius

Maldivian President Mohamed Nasheed signs a document underwater calling on all countries to cut down their carbon dioxide emissions in Girifushi, about 20 minutes by speedboat from the capital Male, Maldives, Oct. 17, 2009.

Credit:

Mohammed Seeneen/AP

The speaker of parliament of the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, has been an outspoken advocate for action on climate change since he was the country's president. He spoke with The World's environment editor Carolyn Beeler in Glasgow, Scotland, about the dire consequenses of not meeting climate goals.

It takes a village to run The World

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It starts with our reporters and producers, who pitch their ideas for stories or interviews during the morning meeting. Editors ask questions like, “why this story?” And “why now?” Once a pitch is greenlit, reporters chase down the story and producers look for a compelling interview guest. Then, together with editors and engineers, they bring it to life on air.

But our work isn’t possible without the generosity of listeners like you. Make your gift before Nov. 30 to support our nonprofit newsroom and help us unlock a $67,000 match!

Double Take

Vietnam's Minister of Public Security has faced criticism back home for dining on a nearly $2,000 gold-plated steak. He was hand-fed a bite of the delicacy by the famous chef known as Salt Bae himself at a high-end London restaurant. What's more, To Lam's fancy dinner came just a day after he laid flowers at Karl Marx’s grave.

In case you missed itListen: Who pays for damages due to climate change?

Kenyan Treasury Cabinet Secretary Ukur Yatani, left, and Mark Carney, the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Finance Adviser for COP26 and the UN Special Envoy for Climate Action and Finance sit on stage at the COP26 UN Climate Summit in Glasgow, Scotland, Nov. 3, 2021. 

Credit:

Alberto Pezzali/AP

For years, developing countries have been lobbying for money through the United Nations system to pay for damages and losses from climate change. Where does the finance issue stand now? And, Dearborn, Michigan is home to many immigrant populations, but especially Arab Americans. Last week, the city elected its first Arab American Muslim mayor, Abdullah Hammoud. Plus, forced migration can be the most painful experience of one's life. Thousands of Afghans have experienced this since last August, when the Taliban took over. They all made last-minute decisions about what to leave behind or take with them. We hear from two women and their final decision.

Don't forget to subscribe to The World's Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.

Policymakers rush to stave off economic collapse on the African continent

Policymakers rush to stave off economic collapse on the African continent

Few industries on the continent have been spared by the epidemic. The region is projected to experience its first recession in 25 years, according to the World Bank. Among the biggest challenges for Africa is the large scale of people employed in the informal sector.

By
Halima Gikandi

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A health worker checks a man’s temperature during door-to-door screening in an attempt to contain the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Jika Joe informal settlement in Pietermaritzburg, South Africa, April 16, 2020. 

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Rogan Ward/Reuters

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While African countries were among the last to be hit by the novel coronavirus, the pandemic is already taking a toll on economies. Policymakers and economists are proposing all kinds of solutions to stave off a catastrophe, including large-scale debt relief. 

Few industries on the continent have been spared by the epidemic. The region is projected to experience its first recession in 25 years, according to a new report by the World Bank on the economic impact of COVID-19 on African economies.

“The countries that are more dependent on tourism are taking a big hit,” said César Calderón, a lead economist at the World Bank who co-authored the report. “You can think about Botswana or Kenya, Mauritius, South Africa.”

While Africa has some of the fastest-growing economies on the planet, they face unique challenges due to the pandemic.

“In the case of Africa, of course, there’s the challenge of the informal sector being the main source of employment.”

César Calderón, economist, World Bank

“In the case of Africa, of course, there’s the challenge of the informal sector being the main source of employment,” Calderón said. The International Labour Organization estimates Africa’s informal sector accounts for more than 85% of overall employment. 

According to Calderón, policymakers should prioritize assisting those workers who will no longer be earning, as well as supporting the micro-, small- and medium-sized businesses that represent the majority of businesses in most African countries.

Related: Trump’s WHO funding cut harms ‘fragile’ health systems, says organization’s Africa head

Policymakers across the continent have already jumped into emergency mode, expanding cash transfer programs, lowering the costs of mobile payments and slashing bank interest rates.

Still, these types of relief efforts take massive fiscal resources.

“The region is not in the same position that it was in 2008,” Calderón said. “Many countries in the region had a healthy fiscal balance, they had higher growth rates, they were enjoying this period of growth [of] about 5%.”

The continent’s strongest economies have been hampered in recent years by low commodity prices, slowing growth rates and ballooning debt — meaning even the most ambitious relief measures could be constrained by the reality of low liquidity.

That dilemma has led many to argue that African countries, among others, require major financial resources to stop the spread of coronavirus. 

Related: In Senegal, COVID-19 safety measures conflict with cultural traditions

“We can not afford fiscal distancing,” said Akinwumi Adesina, president of the African Development Bank, during a press conference last week. “We must move rapidly and aggressively to give Africa maximum support to contain this epidemic,” he continued.

As part of that effort, the African Development Bank has committed $10 billion to African countries’ emergency response and deferred debt payments for the private sector.

Still, Adesina argued, these types of debt deferments should extend to countries as well. 

“It’s time for all of us to work together globally to reprofile debt payments for African countries,” he said.

Related: What the US can learn from West Africa to slow the spread of coronavirus

This month, the African Union appointed special envoys to help mobilize economic support from the international community.

Calls for large-scale debt service or debt relief have grown from outside of the continent as well. During a national address Monday, French President Emmanuel Macron said the world should “help them economically by massively canceling their debts.”

Earlier this week, the International Monetary Fund announced it would pay the debt for 25 countries for next six months, helping them free up money for their emergency responses. 

Days later, G20 countries agreed to freeze bilateral debt service payments for some of the world’s poorest countries.

Wizkid – African Bad Gyal (feat. Chris Brown) (Sounds From The Other Side Album)

Yeah, StarBoy
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
Let me hear you say, yeah, yeah
Sarz on the beat
Yaga
Them no born me yesterday
Every gyal, want designer
Them no born me yesterday
I know say your love will cost me something
Girl you dey do me something something
Ee dey do me like you gonna
I see the fire, bring the rice
Burnin’ like a cigarette
Baby girl are you from Ghana?
Or you coming from Somalia?
Ah you coming from Uganda?
Or you’re coming from Nigeria?
African bad gyal
Baby, don’t change your style
Girl, I love you the way you are
The way you are
Feeling the dancing, gan
Sarz on the beat, gan
Feeling the dancing, gan
Starboy kill the beat, yeah, ayy
Them no born me yesterday
Be a freaky girl and whine up
I put my hand up on the waist
Baby girl, you are the one, oh
Ooh, baby, you you got something
Gimme, gimme all of your love, I want it
Baby girl, stop with all the fronting
The way you dance, I know you want this
Baby girl, you from Angola
Sister from South Africa
Pretty girl, I wanna hold ya
Shout out to my ladies in Nigeria
African bad girl
Baby, don’t change your style
Girl, I love you the way you are
The way you are
Feeling the dancing, gan
Sarz on the beat, gan, yeah, yeah
Feeling the dancing, gan, yeah, yeah
Star Boy kill the beat, yeah, ayy
Say, if you like Galala, make you dance
Say if you like Konto, make you dance
Say if you like this or if you like that
Say you like bouncin’, make you bounce
Say, if you like galala, make you dance
Say if you like Konto, make you dance
Say if you like this or if you like that
Say you like bouncin’, make you bounce
I love the things you do to me, I feel alright
I love the feeling, that I feel, I’m feelin’ nice
I love the things you do to me, I feel alright
You give me life, you give me life, you give me life
See, baby gyal, please, baby gyal jo fun mi
Omoge jo fun mi
Wit’ your sexy body, yeah, wit’ your sexy body
Baby gyal, please, baby gyal jo fun mi
Omoge jo fun mi
Wit’ your sexy body, yeah, wit’ your sexy body
African bad gyal
Baby, don’t change your style
Girl, I love you the way you are
The way you are
Feeling the dancing gan, yeah, yeah
Sarz on the beat gan, yeah, yeah
Feeling the dancing gan, yeah
Star Boy kill the beat, yeah, ay
Yeah

African bad gyal – Wizkid feat. Chris Brown lyrics

Lyrics Wizkid – African bad gyal

Them no born me yesterday
Evrey gyal, want designer
Them no born me yesterday
I know say your love will cost me something
Girl you dey do me something something
Ee dey do me like igbana
I see the fire, bring the rice
Burnin’ like a cigarette
Baby girl are you from Ghana?
Or you coming from Somalia?
Ah you coming from Uganda?
Or you’re coming from Nigeria?(african bad gyal)

African bad gyal
Baby, don’t change your style
Girl, I love you the way you are
The way you are.

Feeling the dancing, gan
Sarz on the beat, gan
Feeling the dancing, gan
Starboy kill the beat, yeah, ayyy.

Them no born me yesterday
Be a freaky girl and whine up
I put my hand up on the waist
Baby girl, you are the one, oh
Oooh, baby, you you got something
Gimme, gimme all of your love, I want it
Baby girl, stop with all the fronting
The way you dance, I know you want this
Baby girl, you from Angola
Sister from South Africa
Pretty girl, I wanna hold ya
Shout out to my ladies in Nigeria.

African bad girl
Baby, don’t change your style
Girl, I love you the way you are
The way you are.

Feeling the dancing, gan
Sarz on the beat, gan
Feeling the dancing, gan
Star Boy kill the beat, yeah, ayy.

Say, if you like Galala, make you dance
Say if you like Konto, make you dance
Say if you like this or if you like that
Say you like bouncin’, make you bounce
Say, if you like galala, make you dance
Say if you like Konto, make you dance
Say if you like this or if you like that
Say you like bouncin’, make you bounce.

I love the things you do to me, I feel alright
I love the feeling, that I feel, I’m feelin’ nice
I love the things you do to me, I feel alright
You give me life, you give me life, you give me life
See, baby gyal, please, baby gyal jo fun mi
Omoge jo fun mi versuri-lyrics.info
Wit’ your sexy body, yeah, wit’ your sexy body
Baby gyal, please, baby gyal jo fun mi
Omoge jo fun mi
Wit’ your sexy body, yeah, wit’ your sexy body.

African bad girl
Baby, don’t change your style
Girl, I love you the way you are
The way you are.

Feeling the dancing gan, yeah, yeah
Sarz on the beat gan, yeah, yeah
Feeling the dancing gan, yeah
Star Boy kill the beat, yeah, ayyy.
Wizkid lyrics
Video gyal