India repeals controversial farm laws after a year of protests

class=”MuiTypography-root-228 MuiTypography-h1-233″>India repeals controversial farm laws after a year of protestsThe WorldNovember 19, 2021 · 12:30 PM EST

Protesting farmers ride tractors and shout slogans as they march to the capital, breaking police barricades, during India's Republic Day celebrations in New Delhi, India, Jan. 26, 2021.

Altaf Qadri/AP/File photo

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

India
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has announced that his government will withdraw controversial farm laws that have been met with massive protests over the past year. Farmers have been protesting government overhauls that they say would ruin their livelihoods. They’re now celebrating the move as a hard-fought victory. Modi timed his announcement for the Sikh holiday Guru Nanak Jayanti to acknowledge India’s minority Sikh community that’s made up the base of the protests. Farmers are also one of India’s most influential voting blocs, and Modi’s reversal comes ahead of next year’s election.

Austria
As Austria faces a fourth wave of COVID-19 cases, the country is set to go into a nationwide lockdown, beginning on Monday and lasting for at least 10 days. The government is also planning to make vaccination mandatory — a first of its kind policy for Europe. Chancellor Alexander Schallenberg plans to impose the vaccine mandate beginning Feb. 1 of next year. Austria had one of the lowest vaccination rates in Europe, at just under 66%. It also has one of the highest national infection rates of the coronavirus on the continent, registering 14,212 new cases in just 24 hours on Thursday.

Brazil
Deforestation of Brazil’s Amazon rainforest is at a 15-year high, surging by 22% in the past year, according to a government report. The statistics undercut President Jair Bolsonaro's assurances that the country has been curbing illegal logging. Brazil’s space research agency (INPE) showed that the country had recorded 5,110 square miles of deforestation. Brazil recently pledged at the COP26 UN climate summit in Glasgow to end illegal deforestation by 2028.

From The WorldBrazil’s COVID vaccination campaign picks up thanks to a 1980s public health mascot

Olympic athletes, from left, archer Marcus Vinicius D'Almeida, Paralympic rower Michel Pessanha, swimmer Marcela Cunha and swimmer Larissa Oliveira pose for a photo with the mascot of the vaccination campaign, named "Zé Gotinha," or "Droplet Joe," after they got shots of the Pfizer vaccine at Urca military base in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, May 14, 2021. 

Credit:

Silvia Izquierdo/AP

Three generations of Brazilians have grown up with Zé Gotinha, roughly translated as Droplet Joe, and many say the little guy is responsible for the country's overwhelming vaccine acceptance.

The mascot is shaped like a drop of liquid, because that's how the polio vaccine was administered in Brazil back in the 1980s. He's been a huge part of the country's world-renowned vaccination program.

Only 1 in 7 households in Ghana has a toilet. Communities are fighting to ensure sanitation for all.

A bustling street scene in Ghana, where only 1 in 7 households has a toilet. 

Credit:

Ridwan Karim Dini-Osman/The World 

Thousands of Ghanaians resort to open defecation due to a lack of access to clean toilets. Some young people in Ghana are leading the movement to change the narrative around this dangerous practice.

Go behind the scenes with one of our correspondents.

Shirin Jaafari, a correspondent with The World since 2015, traveled to Afghanistan in July 2021 to report on the quickly evolving situation as the US withdrawal process was underway.

Take a behind-the-scenes look at her reporting from Herat days before the Taliban overtook the city.

Putting together stories in hostile environments is time- and resource-intensive. Make a gift today to support the work of Shirin and others here at The World. Thank you!

Bright Spot

Snoopy, complete with a NASA space suit, is heading to the moon and back aboard Artemis I, an unmanned mission scheduled to circle the moon and return to Earth in February. NASA uses stuffed animals on flights becuase when they start floating, it indicates the point of zero gravity. Snoopy's role on this mission is to ensure that all systems are working for future crews.

In case you missed itListen: North America leaders’ summit convenes

Mexico's President Andrés Manuel López Obrador addresses the United Nations Security Council, Nov. 9, 2021. 

Credit:

Richard Drew/AP

Leaders from the US, Canada and Mexico are holding their first in-person meeting on Thursday in the first summit of its kind in five years. Each brings conflicting interests in issues of migration, trade and the pandemic. And capitol rioter Evan Neumann is wanted by the FBI for his involvement in the Jan. 6 insurrection. Neumann recently turned up in Belarus hoping to seek asylum there. Plus, climate change and environmental degradation are two ways that China is paying a price for its fast-paced economic growth over the past 20 years. In Shanghai, a Chinese performance artist has some unusual ways of raising awareness about pollution.

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Heavy smog shuts down schools in India’s capital

class=”MuiTypography-root-228 MuiTypography-h1-233″>Heavy smog shuts down schools in India’s capitalThe WorldNovember 17, 2021 · 9:30 AM EST

Commuters drive amidst morning haze and toxic smog as schools and some coal-based power plants close down in New Delhi, India, Nov. 17, 2021.

Manish Swarup/AP

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

India
Schools and colleges have shut down indefinitely in the Indian capital, New Delhi, and several neighboring provinces due to high levels of air pollution that have continued to worsen. Some coal power plants and construction sites have also been closed as the levels of the fine particulate matter PM2.5 are far higher than those considered safe by the WHO. People venturing outside have reported difficulty breathing, nausea and stinging in the eyes, and doctors have seen a sharp increase in hospital admissions due to respiratory problems. Officials are mulling over whether to impose a lockdown, similar to those used to control the spread of the coronavirus. If it goes into effect, the lockdown could be the first of its kind to curb pollution. High levels of air pollution are common there, especially during the winter months, making New Delhi one of the most polluted capital cities in the world.

Canada
Thousands of homes in the Canadian province of British Columbia have been evacuated after what officials are calling the “worst weather storm in a century.” It’s also affected areas of the US Pacific Northwest. The flood waters have severely damaged roads and train routes around the city of  Vancouver and have cut access to Canada’s largest port. Canada’s Minister of Public Safety Mike Farnworth said he had no doubt that the storm was linked to climate change. Moisture that originates in tropical regions and is moved across the atmosphere by an "atmospheric river" has dumped an amount of water equivalent to the region’s monthly precipitation average in just 24 hours.

Kenya
US Secretary of State Anthony Blinken is in Kenya, a key US partner in East Africa. In a private meeting with President Uhuru Kenyatta and top country officials, Blinken focused on regional security issues, such as Kenya’s role in easing the conflict in Ethiopia, democracy in Sudan and combating the threat of terrorism in the region.

From The WorldMigrants restricted from entering the US due to Title 42 see double standard

Psychologist Sebastián Farías speaks with asylum-seekers inside a migrant encampment on Nov. 6, 2021. 

 

Credit:

Max Rivlin-Nadler/The World

The US has reopened its land borders to vaccinated travelers, but not to many asylum-seekers, even if they are vaccinated. This reality is leaving migrants in Tijuana, Mexico, increasingly desperate for their chance to seek asylum in the US.

Cuban govt supporters resorted to tactics they haven't used in decades to suppress political dissidents, professor says

Soldiers patrol along the Malecón seawall in Havana, Cuba, Nov. 15, 2021.

Credit:

Ramon Espinosa/AP

Nationwide protests planned for Monday in Cuba were curtailed by security forces. Lillian Guerra, a professor of Cuban history and the director of the Cuba Program at the University of Florida, described the culture of repudiation in the country to The World's host Marco Werman.

Go behind the scenes with one of our correspondents.

Shirin Jaafari, a correspondent with The World since 2015, traveled to Afghanistan in July 2021 to report on the quickly evolving situation as the US withdrawal process was underway.

Take a behind-the-scenes look at her reporting from Herat days before the Taliban overtook the city.

Putting together stories in hostile environments is time- and resource-intensive. Make a gift today to support the work of Shirin and others here at The World. Thank you!

Double Take

After selling for $34.9 million at auction in New York, a Frida Kahlo painting has now become the highest-selling work of Latin American art. The record was previously held by her husband Diego Rivera, and the painting itself expresses the decadeslong tumultuous relationship the couple shared.

In case you missed itListen: Poland-Belarus border tensions escalate

A Polish army vehicle drives past a checkpoint close to the border with Belarus in Kuznica, Poland, Nov. 16, 2021.

Credit:

Matthias Schrader/AP

Migrants remain stranded at the Poland-Belarus border, attempting to cross into the EU and seek asylum. What does the escalating tension mean for Europe? And the virtual meeting between US President Joe Biden and China’s Premier Xi Jinping was big news in China, with state media calling it a success. We hear reactions from China. Plus, archaeologists in Israel say an amethyst ring they uncovered recently was likely used as a hangover cure in the third century. We hear about a few other hangover remedies that have gathered faith over time.

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US and Chinese presidents strike conciliatory tone during hourslong meeting

class=”MuiTypography-root-228 MuiTypography-h1-233″>US and Chinese presidents strike conciliatory tone during hourslong meetingThe WorldNovember 16, 2021 · 10:00 AM EST

President Joe Biden meets virtually with Chinese President Xi Jinping from the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Nov. 15, 2021.

Susan Walsh/AP

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

US-China
US President Joe Biden and Chinese President Xi Jinping held a virtual meeting on Monday in an effort to repair relations between the two largest world superpowers. The two leaders struck a conciliatory tone during the meeting, calling for cooperation from both sides. But the 3 1/2-hour meeting ended without tangible results. In follow-up statements, both sides aired their respective grievances. Biden mentioned human rights abuses in China and “unfair trade and economic policies,” while Xi said that US support for Taiwan was “playing with fire.”

Ecuador
The head of Ecuador's prison system has resigned, along with the country's armed forces chief, following fresh gang violence that left another 68 inmates dead in a prison in the city of Guayaquil. The violence happened at the same prison where 119 inmates were killed in September in what authorities called the worst riots in the country’s history. The most recent incident happened during a 60-day state of emergency that President Guillermo Lasso had declared inside the prison system to allow for extra funds to be allocated to fight violence inside the jails. Lasso has announced a plan to allow for military involvement to deal with the ongoing violence.

Uganda
Twin blasts in Uganda’s capital have left at least three people dead and dozens more injured. It’s the latest in a string of attacks over the past month in the East African country. A suicide bomber detonated the first bomb near the central police station, followed by two attackers on motorbikes blowing themselves up near parliament. Who is behind the attacks is still under investigation, and authorities have urged the public to close businesses and leave the blast areas.

From The WorldCOP26 made incremental progress but failed to deliver on ‘transformational’ change, negotiators say

Climate activists hold a demonstration through the venue of the COP26 UN Climate Summit in Glasgow, Scotland, Nov. 12, 2021. Negotiators from almost 200 nations were making a fresh push to reach agreements on a series of key issues that would allow them to call this year's UN climate talks a success.

Credit:

Alastair Grant/AP

The UN climate summit in Glasgow, Scotland, wrapped up this past weekend, issuing a set of agreements that use the strongest language yet to convey the gravity of the climate crisis.

Leaders also pledged more funding for adaptation and finalized long-awaited rules for carbon markets within the UN system.

But nearly every climate envoy or minister at the meeting left Glasgow saying more needs to be done — and fast.

'If you can avoid a crash, you can avoid an ambush,' tactical driving expert says

Ronnie Bucknum of the US, driving Honda #12, leads Joakim Bonnier of Sweden, in a Bragham-Climax #15, and Bob Bondurant of the US, during the running of the US Grand Prix at Watkins Glen, New York, Oct. 3, 1965.

Credit:

AP/File photo

Legendary race car driver and driving instructor Bob Bondurant died on Sunday at the age of 88.

Bondurant decided many years ago to become a driving instructor after crashing his car and flipping it eight times and breaking some bones in the process. He taught Hollywood celebrities like James Coburn, Paul Newman, Clint Eastwood, and Christian Bale.

What's less known is that Bondurant also taught tactical driving to security teams for heads of state from around the world. 

Anthony Ricci, who runs Advanced Driving and Security, Inc., took The World's host Marco Werman into the world of tactical driving and how it's used to protect important people.

Go behind the scenes with one of our correspondents.

Shirin Jaafari, a correspondent with The World since 2015, traveled to Afghanistan in July 2021 to report on the quickly evolving situation as the US withdrawal process was underway.

Take a behind-the-scenes look at her reporting from Herat days before the Taliban overtook the city.

Putting together stories in hostile environments is time- and resource-intensive. Make a gift today to support the work of Shirin and others here at The World. Thank you!

Global Hit

"The Hands of Time" is Weedie Braimah's new album — and his debut recording as a bandleader. This is also the album where the Ghanaian American artist puts the djembe drum at the forefront of his band.

The goblet-shaped hand drum, which originated in present-day Mali more than four centuries ago, has become an international symbol of African music.

As a djembefola — one who speaks through the drum — Braimah works to expand the boundaries of his instrument without sacrificing its identity and heritage. Enjoy some music from Braimah and other artists who we've featured on the show on this Spotify playlist. 🎶

Weedie Braimah's "The Hands of Time" features the power and range of the djembe. 

Credit:

Courtesy of Weedie Braimah

In case you missed itListen: COP26: Gaps between ambition and action

A thermometer records just below 100 degrees in a north Seattle neighborhood, July 29, 2009, approaching record highs. While world leaders hail the 2021 Glasgow climate pact as a good compromise that keeps a key temperature limit alive, scientists are much more skeptical. 

Credit:

Elaine Thompson/AP/file

The UN climate summit wrapped up this past weekend, issuing a set of agreements that use the strongest language yet to convey the gravity of the climate crisis. But nearly every climate envoy or minister at the meeting left Glasgow saying more still needs to be done — and fast. And Britain's terror threat level has been raised from "substantial" to "severe" following an explosion outside a hospital in Liverpool on Sunday morning. One man died at the scene and four men have since been arrested. Plus, master djembe player Weedie Braimah has a new album, “The Hands of Time,” where he shows off the djembe's range and power.

Don't forget to subscribe to The World's Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.

EU places new sanctions on entities facilitating migration to Belarus

class=”MuiTypography-root-228 MuiTypography-h1-233″>EU places new sanctions on entities facilitating migration to BelarusThe WorldNovember 15, 2021 · 1:00 PM EST

Migrants make their way to the checkpoint "Kuznitsa" at the Belarus-Poland border near Grodno, Belarus, on Nov. 15, 2021.

Oksana Manchuk/BelTA pool photo via AP

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Belarus
The EU has agreed to slap new sanctions on airlines, travel agents and others accused of facilitating the transport of migrants from Middle Eastern countries to Belarus, as the border crisis in Poland and Lithuania deepens. Nearly 4,000 migrants are living in makeshift camps on the Poland-Belarus border with Poland stepping up border security and accusing Belarusian authorities of leading groups of migrants to cross the border. With this wider scope of sanctions, the bloc will now target individuals and entities organizing or contributing to what the EU says is an organized plan by President Lukashenko to lure immigrants and destabilize Europe. In 2015, a refugee crisis that saw 1 million people entering European countries created deep divisions within the bloc over the management of migrants.

Myanmar
American journalist Danny Fenster has been released from a Myanmar prison and is on his way back to the US, via Qatar, after spending nearly six months in jail. Fenster, the managing editor of the online magazine Frontier Myanmar, was handed an 11-year sentence by a military court last week on charges of spreading false or inflammatory information, contacting illegal organizations and violating visa regulations. His release has been reportedly brokered by US ambassador and former New Mexico governor Bill Richardson, who is in Myanmar. Six other journalists have also been convicted in Myanmar since February this year, when the country’s military ousted the democratically elected government of Aung San Suu Kyi.

Austria
In a new measure to control the COVID-19 surge, Austria has imposed a lockdown for those who have not been fully vaccinated against the virus, which consists of nearly 2 million people. With this new regulation that took effect at midnight on Sunday, initially for 10 days, those over 12 years of age who cannot prove they are fully vaccinated or who have recovered from COVID-19 will only be allowed to leave home for essential activities, such as going to the doctor, grocery shopping or going to get vaccinated. Increased police patrols will enforce the rules and hand over fines of $1,600 for noncompliance. Unvaccinated people had already been banned from visiting restaurants, hair salons and cinemas, but will now be expected to stay at home. In Austria, 65% of the population of 8.9 million people have been vaccinated, but the country, like several other European nations, is seeing an uptick in cases.

From The World'Born in Blackness': A new book centers Africa in the expansive history of slavery

São Sebastião Fort and Museum with statues of conquistadors São Tomé. 

Credit:

Courtesy of Howard French

Major aspects of the trans-Atlantic slave trade from an African perspective have gotten erased throughout time. Howard French set out to illuminate a more expansive understanding in a new book called "Born in Blackness: Africa, Africans, and the Making of the Modern World, 1471 to the Second World War."

Elections in Libya should be part of a larger process toward peace, analyst says

From left head of the Presidential Council of Libya Mohamed al-Manfi, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President Emmanuel Macron, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi and Libyan Prime Minister Abdul Hamid Dbeibah attend a press conference following a conference on Libya in Paris, Nov. 12, 2021.

Credit:

Yoan Valat/Pool Photo via AP

A summit in Paris on Libya's future is focused on ensuring that the country stays on track for planned elections in December. Emadeddin Badi, a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council, tells The World's host Marco Werman that pushing for these elections at any cost is problematic.

Go behind the scenes with one of our correspondents

Shirin Jaafari, a correspondent with The World since 2015, travelled to Afghanistan in July 2021 to report on the quickly-evolving situation as the US withdrawal process was underway.

Take a behind-the-scenes look at her reporting from Herat days before the Taliban overtook the city.

Putting together stories in hostile environments is time and resource-intensive. Make a gift today to support the work of Shirin and others here at The World. Thank you!

Bright Spot

Sesame Street has a new star! 🌟

Ji-Young will make history as the first Asian American muppet on the popular children's show. She is Korean American and has two passions: rocking out on her electric guitar and skateboarding. 🎸 She will formally be introduced on a Thanksgiving Day special.

Ernie, a muppet from "Sesame Street," appears with new character Ji-Young, the first Asian American muppet, on the set of the long-running children's program in New York on Nov. 1, 2021.

Credit:

Noreen Nasir/AP/File photo

In case you missed itListen: COP26: What’s next?

Patricia Espinosa, UNFCCC Executive-Secretary, second right, UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, second left, and Alok Sharma President of the COP26 summit, third left, attend a meeting at the COP26 UN Climate Summit in Glasgow, Scotland, Nov. 11, 2021.

Credit:

Alberto Pezzali/AP

COP26 President Alok Sharma has said that the summit will be a success only if it keeps the target of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius alive. But it’s extremely unlikely that countries will commit to those kinds of carbon cuts at the summit. Also, Nov. 13 marks the sixth anniversary of the coordinated terrorist attacks at the Bataclan concert hall and six other sites in Paris. This year, it comes amid a major trial against the 10-man group that carried out the attacks. Plus, ever wonder what happens if a large asteroid goes on a trajectory to hit planet Earth? NASA is now testing a solution called the Double Asteroid Redirection Test — or DART — and they say it’s the world’s first planetary defense mission.

Don't forget to subscribe to The World's Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.

Turkey halts flights for some Arab citizens traveling to Belarus

class=”MuiTypography-root-228 MuiTypography-h1-233″>Turkey halts flights for some Arab citizens traveling to BelarusThe WorldNovember 12, 2021 · 10:00 AM EST

A Belavia plane lands at the International Airport outside Vilnius, Lithuania, May 23, 2021.

Mindaugas Kulbis/AP/File photo

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Turkey
Turkey is halting the sale of airline tickets to Iraqi, Syrian and Yemeni citizens traveling to Belarus, in a bid to stop migrants and refugees from trying to enter the European Union. In a statement, Belarusian state-owned airline Belavia said it would stop allowing the travelers from boarding flights at the request of the Turkish authorities. EU leaders have been pressuring airlines to stop allowing travelers from the Middle East from entering Belarus. Thousands of people have managed to cross illegally into Poland, Lithuania, and Latvia since the summer, while others have been pushed back at border crossings.

Libya
France is hosting a peace conference of nearly 30 countries and organizations to discuss the situation in Libya in an attempt to ensure that planned elections are held in December and avoid further violence. The meeting is being co-hosted by Germany, France, Italy and the United Nations. Libya has been mired in a civil war since the overthrow of Muammar Gaddafi in 2011. Ahead of the Paris meeting, forces loyal to Gen. Khalifa Haftar said that about 300 of his mercenaries will be leaving the country at France’s request.

Myanmar
Myanmar has sentenced American journalist Danny Fenster to 11 years in prison. Fenster has been detained since May and was convicted on three charges: breaching immigration law, unlawful association and encouraging dissent against the military. The ruling was made during a closed hearing in the city of Yangon, and his lawyer said it was the toughest possible sentence. Fenster was the managing editor of the online site Frontier Myanmar, which stated that he had previously worked for Myanmar Now, an independent news site that was critical of the military since its coup in February.

From The World‘I had to burn a lot of my stuff’: Two Afghan women on what they left behind when they fled the Taliban

Hundreds of people gather near a US Air Force C-17 transport plane at the perimeter of the international airport in Kabul, Afghanistan, Aug. 16, 2021.

Credit:

Shekib Rahmani/AP

Thousands of Afghans rushed to leave Afghanistan when the Taliban retook control of the country. Many had to make split-second decisions about what to pack in a small bag or backpack.

'Everything I am would not be the same without being a veteran,' says soldier who served in Afghanistan

Color guard retires the colors during a Veterans Day commemoration ceremony at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, Nov. 11, 2021.

Credit:

Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Yesterday was the first Veterans Day in 20 years with no US troops on the ground in Afghanistan.

The US lost 2,325 service members during that war. Afghan soldiers killed in action number about 100,000. That's the human cost. The monetary cost of the US: about $2 trillion spent on the war in Afghanistan, a conflict that ended with the Taliban regaining control of the country this past August.

Matt Farwell, a veteran of Afghanistan who's written extensively on the war, including his book, "American Cipher: Bowe Bergdahl and the US Tragedy in Afghanistan," reflected on his career and the US pullout from the country with The World's host Marco Werman.

It takes a village to run The World

Have you ever wondered how an idea becomes a story on The World?

It starts with our reporters and producers, who pitch their ideas for stories or interviews during the morning meeting. Editors ask questions like, “why this story?” And “why now?” Once a pitch is greenlit, reporters chase down the story and producers look for a compelling interview guest. Then, together with editors and engineers, they bring it to life on air.

But our work isn’t possible without the generosity of listeners like you. Make your gift before Nov. 30 to support our nonprofit newsroom and help us unlock a $67,000 match!

Global Hit

Say hello to the weekend and to good music! 

Here is a playlist curated by our team with The World's Global Hits from artists featured on the show: Nearly five hours of music. 🎶

The World's Global Hits

In case you missed itListen: EU countries consider border walls to deter migrants

Polish police officers check cars near the border to Belarus, that was closed because of a large group of migrants camping in the area on the Belarus side who had tried to push their way into Poland and into the European Union, in Kuznica, Poland, Thursday, Nov. 11, 2021. 

Credit:

Matthias Schrader/AP

The crisis along Poland's border with Belarus has escalated over the last few days with thousands of migrants stranded there in near-freezing conditions. Barbed wire separates the two countries. Polish authorities are now planning to build an 18-foot wall along its border, and 12 other EU countries are also considering border walls. And, we take a look at a day in the life of a climate negotiator from the island nation of Palau, as he fights for his country’s future at the UN climate summit in Glasgow. Also, the US marks its first Veterans Day following the war in Afghanistan. We hear reflections from one US veteran who fought in the war there.

Don't forget to subscribe to The World's Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.

Chinese Communist Party cements Xi Jinping’s rule

class=”MuiTypography-root-228 MuiTypography-h1-233″>Chinese Communist Party cements Xi Jinping’s ruleThe WorldNovember 11, 2021 · 11:00 AM EST

Portraits of China's former top leaders from left Mao Zedong, Deng Xiaoping, Jiang Zemin, Hu Jintao and including the current President Xi Jinping are seen at a military camp in Beijing, China, after Chinese leaders approve a resolution on the history of the ruling Communist Party, Nov. 11, 2021.

Ng Han Guan/AP

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

China
After a four-day, closed-door session of Chinese Communist Party senior officials, the country’s top leadership passed a resolution enshrining President Xi Jinping’s status in the country’s political history, while securing his political future. In only the third of such resolutions since the party’s founding, Central Committee members declared Xi’s ideology the “essence of Chinese culture,” establishing Xi as an equal to party founder Mao Zedong and his successor Deng Xiaoping. In 2018, the party removed Xi’s term limits. Then, officials told reporters Xi might need more time to assure economic and other reforms. Leadership changes will be announced at the Communist Party congress, likely to be held in 2022 when Xi is on track to secure a third five-year term, with no apparent rival.

South Africa
F.W. de Klerk, South Africa's last president of the apartheid era, has died after battling cancer at the age of 85. In 1990, de Klerk announced the release of Nelson Mandela from prison, which led to historic elections. He shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Mandela for helping to negotiate an end to apartheid. Opinions on de Klerk’s legacy are divided in South Africa. Many also blame him for violence against Black South Africans and anti-apartheid activists during his presidency.

Germany
COVID-19 cases have soared in Germany as the country battles its fourth wave of the virus, registering just over 50,000 cases a day, the highest since the pandemic began almost two years ago. Germany was once seen as an example of how to deal with the coronavirus, but current data has officials worried as the cold weather sets in. Reportedly, Chancellor Angela Merkel has called for an urgent meeting to discuss the country’s response to the crisis. Christian Drosten, a leading German virologist, has joined the call for action, warning that the country could see as many as 100,000 more deaths if nothing is done.

From The WorldDearborn's first Arab American mayor-elect: 'You need not change who you are' to run for public office

Abdullah Hammoud, mayor-elect of Dearborn, Michigan

Credit:

Abdullah H. Hammoud Facebook page

Dearborn, Michigan, has been a center for Arabic language, food and culture for decades. And last week, the city elected its first Arab American Muslim mayor, State Representative Abdullah Hammoud. "You're seeing minority populations and residents begin to really get involved in the political process," Hammoud told The World's host Marco Werman.

At COP26, island nations push hard for countries to meet goal of limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius

Maldivian President Mohamed Nasheed signs a document underwater calling on all countries to cut down their carbon dioxide emissions in Girifushi, about 20 minutes by speedboat from the capital Male, Maldives, Oct. 17, 2009.

Credit:

Mohammed Seeneen/AP

The speaker of parliament of the Maldives, Mohamed Nasheed, has been an outspoken advocate for action on climate change since he was the country's president. He spoke with The World's environment editor Carolyn Beeler in Glasgow, Scotland, about the dire consequenses of not meeting climate goals.

It takes a village to run The World

Have you ever wondered how an idea becomes a story on The World?

It starts with our reporters and producers, who pitch their ideas for stories or interviews during the morning meeting. Editors ask questions like, “why this story?” And “why now?” Once a pitch is greenlit, reporters chase down the story and producers look for a compelling interview guest. Then, together with editors and engineers, they bring it to life on air.

But our work isn’t possible without the generosity of listeners like you. Make your gift before Nov. 30 to support our nonprofit newsroom and help us unlock a $67,000 match!

Double Take

Vietnam's Minister of Public Security has faced criticism back home for dining on a nearly $2,000 gold-plated steak. He was hand-fed a bite of the delicacy by the famous chef known as Salt Bae himself at a high-end London restaurant. What's more, To Lam's fancy dinner came just a day after he laid flowers at Karl Marx’s grave.

In case you missed itListen: Who pays for damages due to climate change?

Kenyan Treasury Cabinet Secretary Ukur Yatani, left, and Mark Carney, the British Prime Minister Boris Johnson's Finance Adviser for COP26 and the UN Special Envoy for Climate Action and Finance sit on stage at the COP26 UN Climate Summit in Glasgow, Scotland, Nov. 3, 2021. 

Credit:

Alberto Pezzali/AP

For years, developing countries have been lobbying for money through the United Nations system to pay for damages and losses from climate change. Where does the finance issue stand now? And, Dearborn, Michigan is home to many immigrant populations, but especially Arab Americans. Last week, the city elected its first Arab American Muslim mayor, Abdullah Hammoud. Plus, forced migration can be the most painful experience of one's life. Thousands of Afghans have experienced this since last August, when the Taliban took over. They all made last-minute decisions about what to leave behind or take with them. We hear from two women and their final decision.

Don't forget to subscribe to The World's Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.

EU officials accuse Belarus of creating a new migrant crisis

class=”MuiTypography-root-228 MuiTypography-h1-233″>EU officials accuse Belarus of creating a new migrant crisisThe WorldNovember 10, 2021 · 12:30 PM EST

A view of a tent camp set by migrants from the Middle East and elsewhere gathering at the Belarus-Poland border near Grodno, Belarus, Nov. 10, 2021.

State Border Committee of the Republic of Belarus via AP

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Poland-Belarus
Western officials are accusing Belarus of intentionally trying to create a new migrant crisis in Europe. Poland has now amassed thousands of troops on its border with Belarus to keep out migrants who recently tried to push across the border, repeatedly attempting to tear down the razor-wire fence erected on Poland's eastern border. At least 2,000 people are now camped out there in freezing temperatures, caught in the middle of an international row. EU officials say Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko is letting asylum-seekers from the Middle East into his country, and then funneling them toward the EU, an allegation Lukashenko has denied.

Ethiopia
Ethiopian authorities have detained more than 70 drivers working with the United Nations in aid delivery, according to a UN spokesperson. It follows the detention of 16 UN staffers and their families on Tuesday, all of whom were ethnic Tigrayans. Government spokesman Legesse Tulu said they were detained because of “participation in terror" unrelated to their work, but didn’t provide further details. Ethiopian officials say they’re detaining people suspected of supporting the Tigray People Liberation Front.

COP26
A draft of the Glasgow agreement was published on Wednesday at the COP26 climate conference in Glasgow, Scotland. The document includes language that says the world should be aiming to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, and acknowledging the role of fossil fuels in the climate crisis. Consensus on the draft is required, and nearly 200 countries will now negotiate its details over the next few days. It urges countries to strengthen their climate plans by the end of next year, while calling for the phasing out of coal and fossil fuel subsidies. Back in 2015, a group of the most climate-vulnerable island nations succeeded in getting the target of limiting 1.5 degrees Celsius written into the Paris agreement. They're back in Glasgow for COP26 to make sure the world stays on target. The World's Carolyn Beeler is in Glasgow and spoke to Mohamed Nasheed, former president and current speaker of parliament for the Indian Ocean nation of the Maldives about what's at stake.

From The WorldOngoing drought devastates parts of Kenya

Ruchi Wario, 60, shepherds livestock at one of the few functioning boreholes in Marsabit County, Kenya, Nov. 3, 2021.

 

Credit:

Halima Gikandi/The World

A monthslong drought in parts of Kenya is endangering the livelihoods of millions of people who rely on livestock. Humanitarian organizations are warning that countless people could be at risk of hunger if the rains don't come soon.

Canada promised to resettle 40,000 Afghans. Many are still waiting for answers.

People walk while vehicles move through the historical Khyber Pass in Jamrud, the main town of Pakistan's Khyber district bordering Afghanistan, Oct. 11, 2021.

Credit:

Muhammad Sajjad/AP

Earlier this year, the Canadian government pledged to resettle 40,000 Afghans, but advocates, and those with loved ones in Afghanistan, say the process must become faster and more transparent.

It takes a village to run The World

Have you ever wondered how an idea becomes a story on The World?

It starts with our reporters and producers, who pitch their ideas for stories or interviews during the morning meeting. Editors ask questions like, “why this story?” And “why now?” Once a pitch is greenlit, reporters chase down the story and producers look for a compelling interview guest. Then, together with editors and engineers, they bring it to life on air.

But our work isn’t possible without the generosity of listeners like you. Make your gift before Nov. 30 to support our nonprofit newsroom and help us unlock a $67,000 match!

Bright spot

Surprise! Yes, that is what happened to the Sotelo family in Lima, Peru, after buying what they thought was a purebred husky for about $13. Neighbors started complaining about "Run Run" chasing and eating guinea pigs, chickens and other domestic animals in the neighborhood. It turns out the beloved pet had a mistaken identity. Run Run was a trafficked Andean fox. 🦊

In case you missed itListen: Migrant crisis continues on Belarus-Poland border

A Polish police car and a military truck are parked at a makeshift check point at the perimeter of the emergency state that covers a 1.9 mile-wide strip along the border with Belarus, Chreptowce near Kuznica, Poland, Nov. 9, 2021.

Credit:

Czarek Sokolowski/AP

On the border between Belarus and Poland, there's been an ongoing standoff between thousands of migrants — mostly from Africa and the Middle East — and Polish border guards. EU countries like Poland have been steadfast in their attempts to deny entry. And, this week, many foreign travelers were finally allowed to enter the US, after a year and a half of intense travel restrictions. But New Zealand remains one of the most closed-off places in the world — even for citizens to reenter — proving most challenging for separated families. Also, the Biden administration has approved the sale of 280 air-to-air missiles for the Saudi air force. Bomb sales to Saudi Arabia are still on hold, but the US is reluctant to block all weapons sales as leverage to encourage Riyadh to improve its human rights record or end its war with the Houthis in Yemen.

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Polish border police push back migrants at Belarus border

class=”MuiTypography-root-228 MuiTypography-h1-233″>Polish border police push back migrants at Belarus borderThe WorldNovember 9, 2021 · 11:15 AM EST

Migrants from the Middle East and elsewhere rest on the ground as they gather at the Belarus-Poland border near Grodno, Belarus, Nov. 8, 2021.

Leonid Shcheglov/BelTA via AP

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Poland
Polish riot police faced off against hundreds of migrants who were trying to storm through from the Belarus side of the border. They cut through razor wire defenses and used branches to try and climb over them. The Polish Defense Ministry posted a video showing an armed Polish officer using a chemical spray through a fence at men who were trying to cut the razor wire, with some migrants throwing objects at police.The migrants, including families with young children, are camped out at the border in freezing temperatures and huddled around campfires as Polish border guards block their entry into the European Union.

COP26
A major point of contention in climate talks at the COP26 conference in Glasgow is the divide between rich and poor countries. On one side are nations that developed and became rich from the Industrial Revolution fueled by coal, oil and gas that started in the UK. On the other side are developing nations being told those fuels are too dangerous for the planet. Meanwhile, poorer countries are the ones feeling the most impact from climate change, with wealthy nations unwilling to foot the bill as compensation. These dynamics play out on week two of COP26 as national delegations discuss how to meet ambitious goals for greenhouse gas reductions. The World's environment editor and correspondent Carolyn Beeler 🎧 ​​reports from Glasgow.

Malawi
Overstone Kondowe has made history after being elected as Malawi’s first member of parliament with albinism, the hereditary lack of pigmentation in the skin, hair and eyes. It’s a significant milestone in a place where the condition still garners intense stigma, discrimination and even physical attacks. It’s also surrounded by superstition, and people with albinism often become the victims of a murderous trade in body parts, which are then used in witchcraft, forcing many children with albinism to refrain from attending school. Kondowe says he plans to work for legislation to protect all people with disabilities.

From The WorldBosnia faces the most serious crisis since the Balkans War, analyst says

Bosnian Serb member of the tripartite Presidency of Bosnia Milorad Dodik holds a speech during the 4th Budapest Demographic Summit in Budapest, Hungary, Sept. 23, 2021.

Credit:

Laszlo Balogh/AP/File photo

Bosnia and Herzegovina has lived in relative peace for the past couple of decades, after ethnic conflict tore through the Balkans in the 1990s. 

Today, fresh tensions are bringing up painful reminders of Bosnia's not-so-distant past. High Representative for Bosnia and Herzegovina Christian Schmidt warned that the country could face the biggest “existential threat of the post-war period” if the international community doesn't curb separatist threats by Bosnian Serbs.

Jasmin Mujanović, a Bosnian political analyst and the author of "Hunger and Fury: The Crisis of Democracy in the Balkans," joined The World's host Marco Werman to break down the situation.

Haitians deported from the US face a stark reality back home. Some are making plans to migrate again.

In Pestel, Haiti, on the country's southern peninsula, Jean-Robert Leger, left, brings in a boat that is a bit smaller than the one he has attempted in to sail to the United States, along with many other migrants aboard. He has yet to succeed in touch US soil. 

Credit:

Monica Campbell/The World

It’s been less than two months since thousands of Haitians were encamped under a bridge in Del Rio, Texas, just at the Mexico border. Some migrants were eventually let into the US. But most were deported to Haiti — often having lived away from the country for years.

In Haiti, many people are having to start all over again, without anything back at home, while others are still trying to figure out how to reach the US. The World's Monica Campbell reports from Haiti.

It takes a village to run The World

Have you ever wondered how an idea becomes a story on The World?

It starts with our reporters and producers, who pitch their ideas for stories or interviews during the morning meeting. Editors ask questions like, “why this story?” And “why now?” Once a pitch is greenlit, reporters chase down the story and producers look for a compelling interview guest. Then, together with editors and engineers, they bring it to life on air.

But our work isn’t possible without the generosity of listeners like you. Make your gift before Nov. 30 to support our nonprofit newsroom and help us unlock a $67,000 match!

Double Take

A 45-year-old computer has gone on auction today and could fetch up to $600,000. But it is not just any old computer, it is one of the few remaining Apple-1 computers that Steve Wozniak and Steve Jobs designed. A possible treasure for collectors. So, forget about your latest generation iPhone. Any bidders?

In case you missed itListen: EU climate chief calls for reaching headline Paris agreement goal

A panel depicting Planet Earth and a message reading 'While you were Talking,’ regarding the COP26 Summit is displayed on St John's Church, in Edinburgh, Scotland, Nov. 7, 2021.

Credit:

Alberto Pezzali/AP

The European Union’s climate chief said during the ongoing COP 26 conference in Glasgow that talks must focus on meeting the headline goal of the Paris agreement. Former US President Barack Obama spoke on the sidelines of the conference on Monday, saying President Joe Biden's climate package will be “historic,” while welcoming the efforts of bipartisan US support in working toward slowing down global warming. Also, pressure is building for more Haitians to migrate by sea, as The World’s Monica Campbell shares first-hand accounts of the latest. And, an app at a Swiss university tries to use augmented reality to help people overcome arachnophobia.

Don't forget to subscribe to The World's Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.

Pfizer announces ‘highly effective’ pill to combat COVID

class=”MuiTypography-root-228 MuiTypography-h1-233″>Pfizer announces ‘highly effective’ pill to combat COVIDThe WorldNovember 5, 2021 · 1:30 PM EDT

The exterior of Pfizer in Groton, Conn. Pfizer Inc., March 2, 2012.

Elise Amendola/AP/File photo

Top of The World — our morning news roundup written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

COVID-19
Pfizer has announced that its antiviral pill Paxlovid is highly effective at preventing severe illness among at-risk people who take the drug soon after exhibiting COVID-19 symptoms. It’s the second of its kind, and could be even more effective than a similar pill offered by Merck, which is still awaiting authorization in the United States. Pfizer says Paxlovid cuts the risk of hospitalization or death by 89% when taken within three days of the start of symptoms, and that the treatment could become available in the next few months.

Saudi Arabia
The US State Department approved its first major arms sale to Saudi Arabia under the Biden administration. The Pentagon plans to send 280 air-to-air missiles valued at up to $650 million. Congress has been critical of the war in Yemen, and has refused to approve many military sales for the kingdom without assurances that the equipment wouldn’t be used to kill civilians. Biden had promised to make Saudi Arabia a "pariah" state during his campaign, and has been criticized for not holding Riyadh accountable for the death of US-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi and other human rights abuses.

Ethiopia
Ethiopia’s Tigray forces say they’re joining with other armed and opposition groups in an alliance against Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed to seek a political transition in the country, following a year of devastating war. The alliance of nine groups, including Tigray forces and the Oromo Liberation Army, was signed in Washington on Friday, and comes as US special envoy Jeffrey Feltman is meeting with senior government officials in the capital Addis Ababa. Meanwhile, allied forces fighting against the central government have said they're "weeks to months'' away from entering the capital, claiming they’re now in control of a town just 99 miles away.

From The WorldThis teen climate activist is blazing a new path to raise environmental awareness in China

Chinese environmental activist Howey Ou in St-Laurent, Lausanne, Switzerland.

Credit:

Jedleb/Wikimedia

Teen climate activist Howey Ou is considered China’s Greta Thunberg, taking to the streets to speak out about climate change. But in a country where speaking up comes with big risks, Ou’s path is often a lonely one.

Professional tree planting: 'It's a combination between industrial labor and high-intensity sport'

An image of a professional tree planter hard at work in British Colombia.

Credit:

Courtesy of Rita Leistner/"Forest for the Trees"

Filmmaker and photographer Rita Leistner, who started planting trees professionally more than 20 years ago, says the work is "brutal." Her latest project brings her back to tree planting in the form of a book and documentary called "Forest for the Trees." She explained the rigors of tree planting to The World's host Marco Werman. 

"An average tree planter burns about 8,000 calories a day. So, that's about the equivalent of running 2 1/2 marathons in terms of caloric output. And you're doing this day in and day out. And that is because you're carrying this heavy weight, you're climbing up and down," Leistner said.

It takes a village to run The World

We are powered by a group of talented and curious reporters, producers and editors who are dedicated to bringing you human-centered stories every day. We’re also buoyed by the community and financial support we receive from you, our listeners.

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When you donate today, you support reporting from our nonprofit newsroom.

Bright Spot

We say "hanging in there" quite often, especially when we've been asked, "how are you doing?" during the pandmic. Have you wondered how people around the world express the state of being OK, but not great? Host Marco Werman called up some of our foreign correspondents to find out. 🎧

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The World

 

 

 

        In case you missed itListen: US diplomat and hostage negotiator heads to Myanmar

In this photo issued by the Myanmar Military True News Information Team, former US ambassador and New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson (left) meets with State Administration Council Chairman, Senior Gen. Min Aung Hlaing in Naypyitaw, Myanmar, Nov. 2, 2021.

Credit:

Myanmar Military True News Information Team/AP

Veteran US diplomat and hostage negotiator Bill Richardson traveled to Myanmar this week, raising hopes for the release of American journalist Danny Fenster, who's been detained by the military junta for five months. And thousands of Afghans are still trying to flee Afghanistan or are somewhere en route to a new home. The US and Canada have historically been the world's two leading countries for refugee resettlement, but they've struggled to meet the needs of this group. Also, in Russia, the number of daily COVID-19 cases and deaths have increased across the country, with new record highs in both categories. Russian President Vladimir Putin announced a nationwide nonworking period to curb the spread of the virus.

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Trump announces new visa restrictions; Saudi Arabia planning only a limited Hajj; White House trade adviser walks back comments

Trump announces new visa restrictions; Saudi Arabia planning only a limited Hajj; White House trade adviser walks back comments

By
The World staff

US President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, June 20, 2020.

Credit:

Leah Millis/Reuters

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Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

US President Donald Trump temporarily suspended the issuance of new work visas for certain foreign workers yesterday, a move widely opposed by business groups. Trump’s presidential proclamation bars most H-1B visas for skilled employees as well as H-2B seasonal worker visas. It also restricts some H-4, J-1, and L-1 visas. Tech companies like Amazon, Google and Twitter, who rely heavily on the H-1B visas, are objecting to the directive.

The White House said the move would help the economy rebound amid the coronavirus crisis and that targeted visa categories pose “a risk of displacing and disadvantaging United States workers during the current recovery.” Critics argue the order is part of the Trump administration’s broader efforts to curb immigration.

The visa suspension, which exempts those already in the US and visa holders abroad, as well as some agricultural, health care and food industry workers, takes effect Wednesday and lasts until the end of the year.

What The World is following

Saudi Arabia said yesterday it plans to allow only a limited Hajj this year because of the coronavirus pandemic. The announcement bars foreign travelers, allowing only people already living in the kingdom to make the religious pilgrimage. As many as 2 million people come to the holy city of Mecca every year for the Hajj.

White House trade adviser Peter Navarro said Monday on Fox News that the China trade deal was “over.” The comment stoked volatility in markets. Later, Navarro walked back the remarks, suggesting his comments were taken “wildly out of context.”

The German region of Guetersloh in the northwest of the country was put under lockdown today as the number of coronavirus cases surged past 1,000 following an outbreak at a meatpacking plant. Guetersloh is home to about 360,000 residents and is the first area in Germany to go back into lockdown.

Russia jails Pussy Riot manager for 15 days for petty hooliganism

Anti-Kremlin activist Pyotr Verzilov poses for a photo before an interview with Reuters in Berlin, Sept. 28, 2018.

Credit:

Reinhard Krause/Reuters 

A Moscow court jailed Pyotr Verzilov, an anti-Kremlin activist and associate of the Pussy Riot punk group, for 15 days on Monday after finding him guilty of petty hooliganism for swearing in public. Kirill Koroteev, a lawyer and the head of the International Practice of Agora, the group that has taken up Verzilov’s case, spoke to The World’s host Marco Werman about what happened.

Discussion: What’s next in the fight against the coronavirus?

A man walks next to a graffiti depicting a cleaner wearing protective gear spraying viruses with the face of Brazil’s President Jair Bolsonaro amid the coronavirus outbreak, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, June 12, 2020. 

Credit:

Sergio Moraes/Reuters

The coronavirus pandemic has infected more than 9 million people globally and caused 440,000 deaths worldwide. With countries starting to reopen while we await vaccines and treatments, what can we expect next and how can we prepare and respond? As part of our series of conversations addressing the coronavirus crisis, The World’s Elana Gordon will be taking your questions while moderating a discussion with epidemiologist Caroline Buckee from Harvard’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health on Tuesday, June 23, at 12 p.m. EST.

Morning meme

Barcelona’s Gran Teatre del Liceu opera reopened its doors to potted plants Monday. Spanish conceptual artist Eugenio Ampudia had the idea to place the plants in the theater, inspired by his connection to nature during the pandemic. The plant-based reopening came a day after Spain’s three-month state of emergency ended.

Nursery plants are seen placed in people’s seats at Barcelona’s Gran Teatre del Liceu, June 22, 2020.

Credit:

Nacho Doce/Reuters

In case you missed itListen: Face masks and the coronavirus crisis

A supporter of US President Donald Trump wears a protective face mask among many other supporters without masks during a campaign rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma, June 20, 2020.

Credit:

Leah Millis/Reuters

The more we learn about the coronavirus, the more the evidence points to the importance of face coverings in limiting the virus’s spread. Still, if you’re confused about the what and the how of masks, you are not alone. And, Beijing had some strong words for Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau this morning: “Stop making irresponsible remarks.” Trudeau reiterated his belief that China’s decision to charge two Canadians with spying was retribution for the arrest of a Chinese tech executive. Also, temperatures above 100 degrees have been recorded in a small town in Eastern Siberia.

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