Megaprojects and austerity measures are transforming southern Mexico

Megaprojects and austerity measures are transforming southern Mexico

The country's economy is in a downward spiral as the coronavirus continues to spread.

By
Shannon Young

Player utilities

download

Listen to the story.

Oaxaca’s landmark Santo Domingo church and the former convent that houses the state’s largest museum have been cordoned off as part of pandemic mitigation measures.

Credit:

Shannon Young/The World

Share

Mexico is one of the hardest-hit countries by the coronavirus pandemic. It has the world’s third-highest death toll, and its curve has yet to bend. 

As the coronavirus continues to spread, the economy is in a downward spiral. Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has not offered economic stimulus checks to citizens but has rebranded controversial infrastructure projects as jobs programs. Among them is the Trans-Isthmus Corridor. 

The sweeping, multibillion-dollar project — criticized by many local Indigenous communities in its path — calls for the expansion of two ports on Mexico’s southern Pacific and Gulf coasts and connecting them with a railway to carry shipping containers. A highway is also slated to run parallel to the tracks. There’s also a plan to connect refineries on both coasts via a pipeline. Finally, the president intends to lure manufacturers to the area by creating 10, tax-favored industrial parks.

“Budget is not an issue. The resources are there. It’s just a question of getting the job done, despite the pandemic.”

Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador

“Budget is not an issue,” López Obrador said in a recent speech at Oaxaca’s Salina Cruz port, which he visited to supervise progress on its expansion. “The resources are there. It’s just a question of getting the job done, despite the pandemic.”

The port expansion is one of several ongoing projects that make up the Trans-Isthmus Corridor. The plan locally referred to as “the megaproject,” could totally reshape Oaxaca’s Isthmus region, a historic trading corridor, Indigenous heartland and home to one of the country’s most important biodiversity hot spots. As with the port project, the planned railway seeks to expand upon existing tracks. López Obrador cut the ribbon on the rail component in June, despite local pandemic restrictions on work and movement. 

Related: As the coronavirus drags on, Mexico’s food prices soar

But the megaproject is underway as several government agencies have been hit by a presidential decree issued in April that has slashed their budgets by 75%. The cuts, framed as an emergency measure to respond to the pandemic, have gutted environmental, cultural, science and arts programs and government bodies for women and Indigenous peoples.

Left off off the chopping block are numerous big-ticket projects, including a new Mexico City airport, a massive oil refinery and a tourist train circuit in the Yucatán Peninsula. Critics point out that many of the contracts for the projects are going to foreign firms or companies linked to Mexico’s politically connected billionaires.

López Obrador compares the Trans-Isthmus Corridor to a Panama Canal across dry land. He is not the first president to float the idea for a corridor. A canal-style project has been proposed on and off since an 1859 treaty between the US and Mexico, which was never ratified but would have given the US authority over the strategic strip of land. 

More recently, the project was dubbed “Plan Puebla Panama” but encountered fierce resistance from local communities and left-leaning opposition politicians. Ironically, Mexico’s center-left government is the political force closest to achieving the megaproject. 

“This megaproject has a history,” said Bettina Cruz of the Oaxacan Assembly in Defense of Land and Territory, an Indigenous-led organization that opposes the Trans-Isthmus Corridor.

Oaxaca’s artisans take part in a protest outside the National Palace to demand the federal government help for the loss of jobs and decrease in their labor services, after the Mexican government declared a health emergency and issued stricter regulations to contain the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Mexico City, April 20, 2020.

Credit:

Henry Romero/Reuters

Cruz’s group says the project will pillage resources, displace Indigenous populations and reduce residents to a source of cheap labor while corporations profit. 

But organizing protests against it is tough during a pandemic. Mexico is approaching 50,000 government-acknowledged deaths from COVID-19. Oaxaca’s Isthmus region is under particularly strict lockdown measures due to the coronavirus, though construction on the corridor has been deemed essential work.

Related: US-Mexico border wall threatens sacred Native lands

In addition, some view the megaproject as bringing economic stability to the region — which is hard to argue against at a time when the pandemic has battered Mexico’s economy. The latest push for it might succeed, especially because López Obrador has public support and an overwhelming majority in Congress.

This worries Cruz, who sees the Trans-Isthmus Corridor as connected to a larger network of megaprojects, including a hydroelectric dam project in Morelos, a new refinery in Tabasco and a tourist train circuit through Mayan lands in the Yucatán Peninsula. 

The projects are an “attempt to reorder territory in the southern region [of Mexico] for the benefit of — and control by — global and US financial interests.”

Bettina Cruz, Oaxacan Assembly in Defense of Land and Territory

Viewed as a whole, the projects are an “attempt to reorder territory in the southern region [of Mexico] for the benefit of — and control by — global and US financial interests,” Cruz said. 

López Obrador defends the project as a way to create thousands of jobs and close the economic gap between Mexico’s industrialized north and its cash-poor, agricultural south. He’s also in a hurry to get it done. 

“We can’t commit the heinous mistake of leaving works incomplete,” he said during his visit to Salina Cruz. He wants the city’s port dredged and expanded within three years, before the end of his term in office. 

“There shall be no pretexts of any kind — be they inclement weather or protests — that could lead to delays in the completion of these works,” he said.

Meanwhile, other government agencies face an uncertain future over deep budget cuts. 

Among them is the National Institute for Anthropology and History, or INAH, as it’s known by its Spanish acronym. It’s the guardian of Mexico’s ancient artifacts and cultural history — and it oversees Mexico’s world-famous pyramids and archaeological zones. 

“It’s catastrophic,” Gilberto López y Rivas, a longtime anthropologist and researcher with the antiquities agency, said of the cuts.

“The INAH isn’t just archaeology. We number around 900 researchers; archaeologists, cultural and social anthropologists, ethnologists, linguists, biologists, architects, restoration workers, forensic specialists … It’s a very wide range of research.” 

Some fear weakening the INAH could lead to looting at ancient sites and fuel antiquities trafficking. 

López Obrador’s administration rode to power in a historic landslide in 2018 on a wave of leftist, rhetorical rejection of the status quo. So, the cuts came as a shock to many. 

“This has been the big surprise,” López y Rivas said. “Two years later, unfortunately — for the country and for those who believed 30 million votes would change the direction past administrations were heading — what we have is a continuation in the very essence of what these past administrations represented.”

He says the administration’s dual discourse — the president often slams neoliberalism and conservatives in speeches while advancing free-market policies — helps to explain the devastating cuts to national programs that safeguard ecosystems, protect Indigenous rights, and keep the country’s history and culture alive.

“It requires not having a memory,” he said of the mental shift needed to accept the administration’s vision for the region. “It’s an induced amnesia that goes against history, culture, identity and the idea of collectivism.”

Beirut blast kills at least 100, injures thousands; Security restrictions in Kashmir; Can artificial crowd noise match up?

Beirut blast kills at least 100, injures thousands; Security restrictions in Kashmir; Can artificial crowd noise match up?

By
The World staff

A drone picture shows smoke from the scene of an explosion at the seaport of Beirut, Lebanon, Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2020.

Credit:

Hussein Malla/AP

Share

Top of The World — our morning news round up written by editors at The World. Subscribe here.

Rescue workers remain on the scene of a massive explosion at Beirut’s port yesterday that killed at least 100 people and wounded as many as 4,000. Scores of people are still missing, and Beirut is in a state of emergency. The explosion rippled across the Lebanese capital, leaving entire city blocks flooded with glass and rubble along with a scene of utter devastation.

It’s unclear what caused the blast. Reports say there was a pair of explosions: The first started with a fireworks warehouse, and the second came from a stockpile of the explosive chemical ammonium nitrate. Many Lebanese blamed the tragedy on decades of corruption and poor governance.

Follow the BBC’s live page for the latest on Beirut.

What The World is following

Security authorities are enforcing restrictions in much of Kashmir today, a year after India revoked the disputed region’s semi-autonomy in a controversial move. The anniversary comes as Reuters reports militants attacked Indian security forces with a grenade and gunfire. There were no immediate reports of casualties, police said.

Coming up on The World today, host Marco Werman interviews former National Security Adviser John Bolton. In his new book, “The Room Where It Happened,” Bolton portrays President Donald Trump as ignorant of basic geopolitics and driven by a desire for reelection — including asking for help from China.

From The WorldCan artificial crowd noise match the thrill of packed stadiums?

Oakland Athletics’ Stephen Piscotty watches a foul ball go into stands filled with photos of fans during a baseball game against the Seattle Mariners, Friday, July 31, 2020, in Seattle, Washington. 

Credit:

Ted S. Warren/AP

With spectators unable to watch live sports in person due to the coronavirus, the cheers and jeers must come from somewhere. Teams, leagues and broadcasters around the world are taking different approaches to provide artificial crowd noise for games.

French Chilean rapper’s new track criticizes politicians’ apathy over coronavirus

Ana Tijoux performs during a concert by female artists on the eve of International Women’s Day in the Zocalo in Mexico City, March 7, 2020.

Credit:

Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Ana Tijoux worked on the new song “Pa Qué?” with the Puerto Rican rapper PJ Sin Suela. They were inspired by the grim developments that have dominated the news for most of 2020.  The single — out last month — is from her forthcoming “Antifa Dance,” her fifth album.

The track’s title can be loosely translated into English as “So why?” It’s a nod to a phrase popularized by a viral video from Mexico in which two men carry an apparently intoxicated friend out of a party. The friend complains, “You already know how I get, so why do you invite me?”

Tijoux says she felt similarly as an artist who likes to sing about a topic that not everyone is receptive to: politics.

Bright spot

A new study suggests there are nearly 20% more emperor penguin colonies in Antarctica than scientists previously thought. Researchers examined high-resolution satellite images of Antarctica and found large patches of poop — yes, guano — confirming 11 more colonies.

Scientists discover new penguin colonies from space! New study using @ESA satellite mapping technology reveals there are nearly 20% more emperor #penguin colonies in #Antarctica than was previously thought. Exciting research @PeterTFretwell & Phil Trathan: https://t.co/5J6Kz4y9Zo pic.twitter.com/5RZCCmk8pB

— Antarctic Survey (@BAS_News) August 5, 2020In case you missed itListen: Explosion rocks Beirut’s port

Smoke rises after an explosion in Beirut, Aug. 4, 2020, in this picture obtained from a social media video.

Credit:

Karim Sokhn/Instagram/Ksokhn/Thebikekitchenbeirut/via Reuters

A massive explosion rocked downtown Beirut on Tuesday, flattening much of the port, damaging buildings and blowing out windows and doors as a giant mushroom cloud rose above the capital. And UN Secretary-General António Guterres warned Tuesday that school closures as a result of COVID-19 “could waste untold human potential, undermine decades of progress, and exacerbate entrenched inequalities.” Plus, the French Chilean singer Ana Tijoux has managed to draw inspiration from at least one aspect of these trying times and has just released a new single, “Pa Qué?”

Don’t forget to subscribe to The World’s Latest Edition podcast using your favorite podcast player: RadioPublicApple PodcastsStitcherSoundcloudRSS.

French Chilean rapper’s new track criticizes politicians’ apathy over coronavirus

French Chilean rapper's new track criticizes politicians' apathy over coronavirus

Ana Tijoux's new song “Pa Qué?” drew inspiration from statements early into the pandemic from politicians like British Prime Minister Boris Johnson and Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro.

By
Jorge Valencia

Player utilities

download

Listen to the story.

Ana Tijoux performs during a concert by female artists on the eve of International Women’s Day in the Zocalo in Mexico City, March 7, 2020.

Credit:

Rebecca Blackwell/AP

Share

The singer Ana Tijoux has been working for much of the pandemic. But on a recent afternoon, she was in Barcelona getting ready to take her cooped-up, 7-year-old daughter to a Catalonia beach. 

“She’s jumping like crazy right now,” Tijoux said with a laugh.

In an interview with The World, the Grammy-nominated French Chilean rapper and composer said the first six months of physical isolation have proven more taxing than anyone expected. 

It has reminded her of the collaborative nature of creating music: Even for a solo artist like her, the work is not solo, she said. 

And for her new single titled “Pa Qué?” she worked with the Puerto Rican rapper PJ Sin Suela. They were inspired by internet humor and the grim developments that have dominated the news for most of 2020.  The single — out last month — is from her forthcoming “Antifa Dance,” her fifth album.

The track’s title can be loosely translated into English as “So why?” It’s a nod to a phrase popularized by a viral video from Mexico in which two men carry an apparently intoxicated friend out of a party. The friend complains, “You already know how I get, so why do you invite me?” 

Tijoux says she felt similarly as an artist who likes to sing about a topic that not everyone is receptive to: politics.

Tijoux drew inspiration from watching politicians respond apathetically to the pandemic. For example, the British prime minister, Boris Johnson, in March bragged about shaking hands with people at a hospital where patients infected by COVID-19 were being treated. Meanwhile, Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro said that same month he wouldn’t be affected by the coronavirus because he had a background as an athlete. Both heads of state later contracted and were treated for the coronavirus. 

And then there was former Chilean Health Minister Jaime Mañalich, who said perhaps the coronavirus could mutate into “a good guy,” in a televised interview that immediately went viral. Tijoux quotes him directly in the first verse of “Pa Qué?”  

“They don’t care about people who are sick or who passed away. They don’t even have empathy, and that makes me worried when people don’t have any emotion about life.”

Ana Tijoux

“It’s surreal,” she said of the politicians’ response to the pandemic. “They don’t care about people who are sick or who passed away. They don’t even have empathy, and that makes me worried when people don’t have any emotion about life.” 

This is Tijoux’s first time rhyming about the coronavirus. It is also her first time rhyming over cumbia, a music genre with Afro Indigenous roots that is massively popular across Latin America, as well as merenhouse, a popular genre with Afro Dominican roots. Some of her influences include Colombia’s Totó la Momposina, Joe Arroyo and the Dominican Republic’s Sandy y Papo, she said. 

The video for “Pa Qué?” features neon-colored cats floating in outer space, banging spoons against pots and pans, and shooting laser beams through their eyes at police officers and government buildings.

The playfulness, humor and seriousness are all connected, Tijoux said. Musicians have opinions — and this one is hers. 

“We’re not here to be pleasant,” she said. “We’re here to be honest with what we think. If you like or not or if it is good or bad, that is not the question. At least it is honest.” 

Colombian airlines face controversy over loans to survive pandemic crisis

Colombian airlines face controversy over loans to survive pandemic crisis

Governments worldwide — from Singapore to the Netherlands and the US — have devoted more than $85 billion to prop up airlines during the coronavirus pandemic. But airlines' requests for aid are controversial in less rich Latin American economies, where millions live in poverty and public health systems are ill-equipped to respond to a large-scale health crisis.

By
Jorge Valencia

Player utilities

download

Listen to the story.

An aerial view shows Colombian airline Avianca’s planes parked at El Dorado International Airport amid the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in Bogotá, Colombia, April 7, 2020.

Credit:

Luisa Gonzalez/Reuters

Share

The Colombian government is considering extending loans to the country’s airlines, as the coronavirus pandemic has grounded their fleets and wiped out most of their revenue through at least June.

Altogether, the country’s airlines would need some $1.2 billion in financial aid to stay in business without flying through the middle of the year, according to the International Air Transport Association, an industry trade group. Most of the cash would likely go to Avianca, which accounts for about half of Colombia’s flights and passengers. Avianca filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in the United States last week.

Governments worldwide — from Singapore to the Netherlands and the US — have devoted more than $85 billion to prop up airlines during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a Bloomberg News analysis. But the request for financial aid is controversial in less rich Latin American economies, where millions live in poverty and public health systems are ill-equipped to respond to a large-scale health crisis.

Related: ‘Reckoning day’ could be ahead for airline industry amid coronavirus challenges

Medellín-based Vivia Air, Colombia’s largest low-cost carrier, has not laid off any of its roughly 730 workers but has instituted across-the-board salary cuts, the company’s chief executive, Felix Antelo, told The World. Antelo’s salary was reduced by 70%. The company is asking the government for a $50 million bridge loan to restart operations once air traffic returns, he said.

“Not for a bailout, not for relief,” Antelo said. “It’s a loan that we will repay, obviously, and those are figures that are reasonable for a country like Colombia.”

Carolina Cortizo, managing director of Bogotá-based airline, Wingo, which employs about 230 people, said the company has reduced its costs by 20% — “which would have seemed awesome pre-COVID[-19]” — but is looking to make further cuts. The company is seeking a loan from the government of less than $12.5 million, she said.

“There’s nothing I want more than to get our planes back in the sky,” Cortizo said. “Our team has been putting a huge effort into the back-to-normal of our airline.”

Related: Governments offer aid as airlines forced to deepen cuts to flights, staffing

But many leaders in Latin America likely see air travel as a luxury and may be reluctant to extend help to airlines during the crisis, said Thijs Boonekamp, an economist with SEO Amsterdam Economics, a think tank. 

In Colombia, about 1 in 4 people live below the poverty line. And in Mexico, President Andrés Manuel López Obrador halted the construction of a new airport for Mexico City because he said it would represent no benefit to the working poor. 

Latin American countries have less “fiscal space” than richer economies to help airlines, said Tomás Serebrisky, an economist with the Inter-American Development Bank.

“They are allocating those resources to more immediate and urgent needs like the need to revamp the health system, or provide income support to the most vulnerable poor of the population,” Serebrisky said.

As the coronavirus drags on, Mexico’s food prices soar

As the coronavirus drags on, Mexico's food prices soar

By
Emily Green

Player utilities

download

Listen to the story.

Maria Solis, a street vendor selling fruit, shows a sign that says “The coronavirus won’t kill me, hunger will. Here you can do your panic buying too,” as the spread of COVID-19 continues in Mexico City, Mexico, March 25, 2020.

Credit:

Carlos Perez Gallardo/Reuters

Share

Hannibal Abdullah-El – My Heroes lyrics

Verse 1

My minds like that of a champion
To get here I blazed past half the men
Hit some in they abdomen
Asked the rest where they been
I’m in it to win
Heat cocked back with a devilish grin
And I swear by the hair on my chin
We gon’ win
Stay ready to put in work like im fresh out the penn
No Emmitt Till still for real like the street called Beale
Move like Kill Bill,
Kill serial, seriously still
Strange fruit hangin at will
No new deal breakernomics
Cash crops
Hydroponics
See the general acknowledge
Ill drop knowledge higher science
You won’t get in college
Knowledge of self
Personal health
Spiritual wealth
B2 stealth my bombs are felt

Chorus

Mohammad Ali
Malcolm X
Those my heroes,
Civil rights
Dark nights
Dogs
Firehouse,
National guard
Vs.
A thousand people,
Flower in the barrel
Gunshot next sequel

Verse 2

Birmingham, Alabama
A bad mama jama,
Except for when they throw you in the slamma,
Church bombs
Napalm
Whistle out, stay calm,
When I see da’ beast
I sound the alarm,
I like moonshine
But not German Shepard k9’s,
Refuse to eat the swine
Life and death are intertwined,
Like George C. Wallace I go hard on a nigga’,
Teeth kicked out with steel toes I ain’t weak how you figure,
Hella bold
Black gold,
Souls are sold
Goin’ on since times of old
Won’t fold,
I get old
But won’t mold,
Sprayed with a fire hose
Front page it was told,
Blak fist in tha air
Got em stripped o’ they gold,
1968 Mexico City
Ain’t no pity
Situations gritty,
1968 Mexico City
Situations gritty
Ain’t no pity!

Chorus

Mohammad Ali
Malcolm X
Those my heroes,
Civil rights
Dark nights
Dogs
Firehouse,
National guard
Vs.
A thousand people,
Flower in the barrel
Gunshot next sequel

Verse 3

I cop clothes,
Not cop clothes
Ahdeegahtos,
To those who expose
Bros who pose with cali Coles,
Then pop those in white robes
Lights out like light bulbs,
Live in the field like marshall’s
Who stalk pro’s ,
Haram not boko,
When I smoke iz like slo mo,
Neva homo
Find me livin’ in a dojo,
O’ Acapulco
Symbolic
Not literally loco,
See you local
Fact not fiction
Put you in a chokehold
Son o’ tha most high
Fresh like a magi
Born in apartheid
Look like an egg when its hard fried
Ain’t on drugs
Hang with thugs
Fly as Malachi with a red eye,
Solo since I left dredi
Some wish they could dead I
Active on the murda plots,
Stopped before they start
Left em leaking full o buckshots,
Call em blood clots,
Now has beens,
So why not,
W/a Z at the end,
Like fags speak b4 they get popped!

Chorus

Mohammad Ali
Malcolm X
Those my heroes,
Civil rights
Dark nights
Dogs
Firehouse,
National guard
Vs.
A thousand people,
Flower in the barrel
Gunshot next sequel

Highlife – 187 Strassenbande songtexte

Songtexte 187 Strassenbande – Highlife

Bonez! Ich liebe meine Euros, ey, bald hab’ ich ‘ne Million’n
Höhö, hat sich doch gelohnt, Autogramme auf Silikon
Heute hier, morgen da, sind auf Tour im ganzen Land
Amsterdam, ein paar Gramm, pack’ es pur in meinen Blunt
Der Grund, warum ich jeden Tag gut drauf bin und mich freue ist
Weil früher war’n die Weiber hässlich, heute alles Säue
Grüße Playmates im Graben mit ‘ner Day-Date am Arm
Ey, wir brauchen euer Geld, um unser Haze zu bezahl’n
Ha’m ‘ne Playstation dabei, komm auf Facebook, wir sind live
Ach, du Scheiße, ich muss gleich schon auf die Stage, doch bin zu high
Und obwohl wir es nicht nötig haben, sind wird schussbewaffnet
F**k die Polizei! Sie kommt in’ Bus, ich werd’ verhaftet
Was deutscher Rap? Ihr verletzt meine Gefühle
Wir zerfetzen jetzt die Bühne und zerbrechen ein paar Stühle
Heh, sind wir auf Tour ist eure Stadt nicht mehr sicher
187 Strassenbande – Waschbeckenpisser.(highlife)

Wir sind auf Tour, jeden Abend nur attackier’n
Die Hallen und die Kassen explodier’n
Wir kommen auf die Bühne und die Tangas lern’n fliegen
Fühl’ mich so wie diese Stars auf MTV
Was für ein High-Life, zwei Nightliner
Baby, willst du blasen, gib mir High-Five
Kipp Kodein in die Sprite, ah
Gib mir das Mic, ahhh
Camora, 187 – das Team ist bereit.

Wache auf in der Koje, Schmuck unterm Kissen
Luxus, der Tourbus, geh’ kurz runter pissen
Unten die Fans und paar Groupies am quietschen
Egal, was du brauchst, brauchst dich nur zu bedienen
Bisschen Fifa, danach wird geschrieben
Die Weiber lieben meine Parts übertrieben
Ein Sack voller Weed, Mann, ich rauche mich high
Ein paar Flaschen Lean hab’ ich auch mit dabei
Die Frau’n werd’n geteilt wie der letzte Schluck Whiskey
Der Backstage mehr Gangster als Mexico City
Gestern McDonalds, heut kauf’ ich mir Lobster
Zwei Busse, ein Truck, Mann, ich glaub’, wir sind Rockstars
Hau’ wie ein Boxer, Outfit Lacosta versuri-lyrics.info
In jeder Stadt shoppen, Mann, ich brauche kein’n Koffer
So viel Exzesse, der Scheiß macht mich müde
Lass sie kurz blasen, muss gleich auf die Bühne.

Wir sind auf Tour, jeden Abend nur attackier’n
Die Hallen und die Kassen explodier’n
Wir kommen auf die Bühne und die Tangas lern’n fliegen
Fühl’ mich so wie diese Stars auf MTV
Was für ein High-Life, zwei Nightliner
Baby, willst du blasen, gib mir High-Five
Kipp Kodein in die Sprite, ah
Gib mir das Mic, ah
Camora, 187 – das Team ist bereit.

Wir sind wieder auf Tour, Digga, jeden Tag reinfeiern
Weed, Buds und Tour’n, es geht ab hier im Nightliner
Dreißig Weiber im Backstage, ich weiß
Sie woll’n S*x und zwar gleich, bin für Action bereit
Maxwell braucht Fleisch, hängt im Cateringbereich
Das Hazi macht mich heiß, ey, ich lebe diesen Scheiß
Hab’ den Soundcheck verschlafen, schnauf’ kurz ‘ne Nase
Lauf durch den Graben, um den Auftritt zu starten
Beweg’ mich zwischen tausenden Farben
Und Fans, die draußen auf ‘n Autogramm warten
Saufen jeden Tag, unser Lebensstil ist krank
Hol die Gläser aus’m Schrank, wenn ich Jägermeister tank’
Die Drogen halten fit, lang kein Sport mehr gemacht
Kann’s mir leisten, weil ich auf meine Vorsätze kack’
Hab’ immer noch ‘nen Kater von vorletzter Nacht
Doch egal, lege trotzdem ein paar Dorfschnecken flach.

Wir sind auf Tour, jeden Abend nur attackier’n
Die Hallen und die Kassen explodier’n
Wir kommen auf die Bühne und die Tangas lern’n fliegen
Fühl’ mich so wie diese Stars auf MTV
Was für ein High-Life, zwei Nightliner
Baby, willst du blasen, gib mir High-Five
Kipp Kodein in die Sprite, ah
Gib mir das Mic, ah
Camora, 187 – das Team ist bereit.

Rein in den Tourbus, rau– ra-rauf– rauf auf die Autobahn
187 represent, Nigga, das sind echte Fans
Weil uns hat niemand was geschenkt, nein
Autogramme und ab ins Hotelll.(highlife)
187 Strassenbande songtexte
Video 187 Strassenbande