Only 1 in 7 households in Ghana has a toilet. Communities are fighting to ensure sanitation for all.

class=”MuiTypography-root-133 MuiTypography-h1-138″>Only 1 in 7 households in Ghana has a toilet. Communities are fighting to ensure sanitation for all.

Thousands of Ghanaians resort to open defecation due to a lack of access to clean toilets. Some young people in Ghana are leading the movement to change the narrative around this dangerous practice.

The WorldNovember 18, 2021 · 12:30 PM EST

A bustling street scene in Ghana, where only 1 in 7 households has a toilet. 

Ridwan Karim Dini-Osman/The World 

Close to 50,000 residents live crammed within the Nima neighborhood in greater Accra, Ghana, a community of homes made of wood, concrete and rusted iron roofing sheets. 

Indeed, living in Nima is a squeeze. 

Here, Rose Alhassan is frying fish with her 8-year-old granddaughter, who fans the pan atop the coal pot resting on red-hot charcoal.

Related: ‘We might be pushed out of business’: Ghana’s vegetable sellers see produce dwindle due to climate change

Alhassan’s house has nine single rooms that accommodate 32 people. Yet, this household — like many across this community — has no toilet.

“The lack of toilets in this house really worries me a lot because the closest public toilet is about 10 minutes’ walk from here. … And I have rheumatism, which gets really unbearable when I walk for that long.”

Rose Alhassan, resident without a toilet at home, Accra, Ghana

Rose Alhassan and her granddaughter are frying fish in the densely packed neighborhood of Nima in greater Accra, Ghana. 

Credit:

Ridwan Karim Dini-Osman/The World 

“The lack of toilets in this house really worries me a lot because the closest public toilet is about [a] 10 minutes' walk from here,” Alhassan said. “And I have rheumatism, which gets really unbearable when I walk for that long.” 

She ends up having to use a plastic bag to defecate, which she then discards into an open drain. 

Related: How the West’s obsession with fast fashion compounds an environmental nightmare in Ghana

About 4.2 billion people lack access to safely managed sanitation worldwide, according to the United Nations. Of those, 3 billion lack basic handwashing facilities and 673 million still practice open defecation, the UN said.

At least 2 billion people use drinking water contaminated with feces globally, according to the World Health Organization. 

In Ghana, 1 in 5 people defecates openly, while only 1 in 7 households in the West African country have toilet facilities.

The bags not only choke gutters, but open drains also pollute the air with putrid odors. 

Alhassan said this practice is widespread.

“All the houses around here don’t have toilets and so usually, when you wake up early in the morning, you will see people throwing toilets [bags] in the drain,” she said. 

Related: Pregnant women and children with HIV in Ghana struggle to access lifesaving medicine during pandemic

"Flying toilets" clog trenches and gutters in the Nima neighborhood of Acrra, Ghana. 

Credit:

Ridwan Karim Dini-Osman/The World 

Ghanaian law requires landlords to provide toilets for their tenants, with associated penalties for defaulters. But over the years, authorities have been lax about effective enforcement of this law. 

In Nima, public toilet conditions have deteriorated. The building has huge cracks with perforated, rusted roofing. Inside, 12 open cubicles choke with heat and the stench of a heady mix of urine, cigarette smoke and piles of feces. 

Health authorities say scenes like these are often hotbeds of infections and diseases like cholera, diarrhea or typhoid.

Outside, desperate patrons in a long queue hold pieces of tissue paper and used newspapers, waiting to take their turn. They pay $0.16 for tissue paper or $0.08 for a used newspaper to access this public toilet.

 

Mariatu Mohammed said coming here at night is a risky affair.

“There is no toilet in my house and so, I meander through so many corners before I get here. And for a girl or woman like me, it is dangerous especially at night,” she said. 

Gender activist Lilipearl Baaba Otoo is concerned about the disproportionate impact of the problem on women and girls in Ghana.

“My work has taken me to so many communities where women have to step out at night to use the bushes because there are no toilets and they are pounced on by either kidnappers, rapists and other unscrupulous people."

Lilipearl Baaba Otoo, gender activist, Ghana

“My work has taken me to so many communities where women have to step out at night to use the bushes because there are no toilets and they are pounced on by either kidnappers, rapists and other unscrupulous people, she said. 

Lilipearl Baaba Otoo is a gender activist who has seen the dangers of using public toilets. 

Credit:

Ridwan Karim Dini-Osman/The World

Otoo said a lack of toilets can also force girls and women to neglect their menstrual health needs. 

Diseases linked to dirty water and a lack of safe toilets cause more deaths among women than diabetes, HIV/AIDS or breast cancer, according to the international development organization WaterAid.

In Ghana, nearly 20,000 people including more than 5,000 children under the age of 5, die each year from diarrhea, with nearly 90% of cases directly attributed to poor water, sanitation and hygiene.

The World Bank estimates that poor sanitation and hygiene results in $290 million in economic losses for the West African nation each year.

But the situation is not all doom and gloom.

Community-led initiatives throughout Ghana aim to reverse these worrying trends. 

In the sprawling community of Fadama, near the capital Accra, a constructor clad in a black apron used his shovel to dig into a mixture of sand, cement and gravel. He repurposes the cement bag into a helmet.

After many years without a toilet, 16 tenants living in a single house plan to construct one. 

Resident Ernest Fullah led the private fundraising effort.

“We face a lot of problems concerning our sanitation situation in this household. So, as a household, we decided to come together, contribute little by little to start this toilet project …"

Ernest Fullah, resident who raised private funds for a toilet at home, Accra, Ghana

“We face a lot of problems concerning our sanitation situation in this household. So, as a household, we decided to come together, contribute little by little to start this toilet project that you are seeing right now, Fullah said. 

Ernest Fullah's household raised private funds to construct their own toilet.

Credit:

Ridwan Karim Dini-Osman/The World 

He says seeing the construction near completion gives him joy.

“Personally, I am very, very happy that at long last, we are going to have a toilet in our house and when you speak to the people in the house too, I can see everybody is happy,” he said. 

In 2013, the World Bank financed the $150-million project aimed at providing water and sanitation to deprived communities in Ghana’s capital. Beneficiary households and institutions pay 30% of the cost. The project has constructed about 30,000 household toilet facilities. The next phase of the program is expected to extend to other parts of the country when funding is made available. 

But the need is still great.  

To complement these efforts, the UN children’s agency, UNICEF, together with its partners, has begun a hackathon for young people to showcase their innovative solutions toward ending open defecation in their communities. 

Nana Kwaku Amoako Oduro-Mensah, 14, is one participant proffering digital solutions: a mobile app concept called T-toilet, to help people locate toilet facilities in their communities. 

“Because people who pass by in towns and other places, do not have any knowledge about the location of toilet facilities and therefore engage in open defecation. With this app, they can easily find a toilet to go and ease themselves comfortably,” he said. 

Barbara Parker, 13, has a different idea — to promote continuous public health education. 

“Building toilet facilities is not really the thing. Many people have the toilet facilities all right but they don’t really have the ways to use it,” she said. 

Nana Kwaku Amoako Oduro Mensah, 14, participates in a hackathon to find solutions for open defecation. 

Credit:

Ridwan Karim Dini-Osman/The World 

UNICEF's deputy country representative, Fiachra McAsey, said the hackathon reinforces the urgency to mobilize young people to play a more critical role in the movement for safer, cleaner sanitation. 

"…We are going to take some of these ideas and we are going to invest in them."

Fiachra McAsey, deputy country representative, UNICEF

“I think it is an accelerator and a way to see change happen very fast. We are going to take some of these ideas and we are going to invest in them,” McAsey said.

Access to sanitation is a human right and part of the UN’s sustainable development goals.

The aim is to end the practice of open defecation by 2030 and ensure that everyone has access to toilets for improved living conditions — and dignity. 

This African American in Ghana says making Juneteenth a federal holiday is a ‘small gesture.’ She urges police reform.

This African American in Ghana says making Juneteenth a federal holiday is a ‘small gesture.’ She urges police reform.

By
The World staff

Producer
Carol Hills

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This year’s Juneteenth celebration in Ghana. Mona Boyd, who is African American and lives in Ghana, says the Juneteenth celebration in Accra has grown over the years. 

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Courtesy of Mona Boyd

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The news that slavery had ended reached Texas on June 19, 1865 — two years after the Emancipation Proclamation was issued.

Annual celebrations and events mark the end of slavery, but this year there’s renewed focus on the holiday amid recent protests pushing for racial equality and systemic change in the US and around the world.

Even corporate America is getting on board — companies like Twitter and Spotify are offering employees paid holidays on Friday. And there’s currently an effort to make Juneteenth a federal holiday.

Mona Boyd, an African American, celebrates Juneteenth in Ghana, where she’s lived for the past 30 years. She moved there from the US in the 1990s.

Boyd talked with The World from Accra, after returning from a  Juneteenth celebration, to explain how the day is celebrated in Ghana and the changes she’d like to see in the US.

“When I came to Ghana, I found a community of African Americans already celebrating this holiday. So, I joined them to celebrate it,” Boyd said. “And since that time, many people have joined us, many Ghanaians, in celebrating the holiday. So, I would say there’s a good knowledge of it. It’s not a holiday that people celebrate when you go upcountry. But down here in Accra, which has people from everywhere, it’s celebrated.”

Related: A professor with Ghanaian roots unearths a slave castle’s history — and her own

Marco Werman: I know from your own story, Mona, that you left the US because you did not think it was a good place to raise your son. How does that affect how you think about Juneteenth?

Mona Boyd: Juneteenth is a holiday that I’m much more connected to than July 4. July 4 was always just a holiday, a free day. But Juneteenth has a lot of significance because it actually means something to me. It was the day that my ancestors learned that they were no longer slaves, that they were now free.

This year, of course, Juneteenth comes in the midst of some major introspection and anger about the deaths of black people at the hands of police in this country. What is it like to observe from Ghana, the protests and the focus on police violence against African Americans right now?

Well, I have kind of mixed feelings because we have been there before. I’m not sure that much will change when it’s all over. You know, I grew up in the rural south under Jim Crow. So, you know, I know racism. I lived in an all-black world because of racism until I went to college. So, I have really mixed feelings about what it will all come to. I think that we need to have some new strategies.

Like what? What would you add?

If you look at American society, the country, everything is based on economics and the kind of capitalistic system that we have. Someone has got to be, from my perspective, someone has got to be at the bottom or else it may not work as well. And I think that what we need to do as black people is try to develop an economic strategy that will lift us from that bottom, which will then give us more power and more control over our lives and over how we are treated in the society.

You know, I’m not a big fan of integration, to be honest with you. I grew up in an all-black town and 50% of the people were self-employed. My father’s father bought his farm. He had been out of slavery maybe 20, 25 years. And then he and his son kept adding onto the land until it got up to around 500 acres. So, we were quite independent. We weren’t marginalized, and we didn’t really have to worry about people respecting us.

I understand your emphasis on creating wealth, but isn’t integration key, though, to eliminating otherness? Like to get people comfortable with the fact that we are all humans?

You know, we all know that. So, why do we have to tell you that? I didn’t feel this way until I left America. Because I had a chance to live in a place where race was not an issue. So, for almost 30 years, I haven’t really in my personal life had to deal with race. So, I was able to step back. Some things are about race. Some things are not about race. And I think if black people don’t do everything through the lens of race, then I think it would be much easier for us to deal with some of these social inequities in our society.

You know, every white person in America, from my perspective, is part of the problem. They know racism is systemic in every arena of America and they benefit from it. I’m not sure people are really willing to give it up. So, this is why I think black people need to start thinking about it differently. I mean, we shouldn’t have to tell people our lives matter. Because for many people, our lives don’t matter to them. And I think that we should decide our lives matter. And this is what we’re going to do to protect our lives on a daily basis. But I think one of the strategies that we have not gone near is looking at what we can do economically because we have a lot of money. We have a lot of money. And we really need to look at how that money is employed in America.

You raised something a moment ago that I want to ask you about — the idea that capitalism needs somebody on the bottom. How do you change that in a world that is driven by profit?

I’m not sure that you change it. I think that you concentrate on how you lessen its impact on you. I don’t see America changing its economic system at all. But, you know, other countries have dealt with this issue. Scandinavian countries tax their people at a 45% rate. So, everybody can have health care, education and enough food, a place to stay. It’s just the American value system, which is solely built on capitalism and nothing else matters.

And it’s not just black people that are marginalized by this capitalism. There are so many poor white people that are marginalized as well. So, getting into the heart and mind, especially the heart of people, of white people, they’re going to have to get into their own hearts because black people are never going to be able to turn that around. It’s been going on since black people have been in America. So, it’s up to white people to get into their own heart and do the right thing.

You said earlier, Mona, how much more Juneteenth means to you than July 4. There is a movement undertaken by a Republican lawmaker from Texas to make it a federal holiday. What do you think about that? I mean, it’s symbolic, is it important to have that?

Well, you know, we have been celebrating Juneteenth probably since slavery on our own without it being a holiday. They can make it a holiday. Personally, it doesn’t matter to me because I’m interested in a much bigger picture than a holiday in terms of change in America. I mean, pass the law that prevents chokeholds. Get rid of the law where cops will have immunity no matter what they do and how they do it. Those are the things that matter to me.

I can continue to celebrate Juneteenth, as I have been, you know, since I started. We cannot think that these little gestures actually are going to give us the results that we need to have happen. They won’t. We’ll just have another holiday.

 

This interview has been condensed and edited.

1.5 billion could lose livelihoods; International students caught in limbo; Ghana’s dancing pallbearers go ‘viral’

1.5 billion could lose livelihoods; International students caught in limbo; Ghana's dancing pallbearers go 'viral'

By
The World staff

A general view of an empty high street in Hemel Hempstead as the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, Britain March 24, 2020.

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Matthew Childs/Reuters

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In fight against coronavirus, Ghana uses drones to speed up testing

In fight against coronavirus, Ghana uses drones to speed up testing

Ghana is the first African country to ease its lockdown in response to the coronavirus. The country is using drones to deliver samples collected in more than 1,000 health facilities across the country.

Writer
María Elena Romero

Reporter
Lydia Emmanouilidou

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COVID-19 tests samples are being delivered from rural areas of Ghana to testing centers in urban areas using drone technology.

 

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Courtesy of Zipline

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This week, Ghana became the first African country to ease its nearly three-week lockdown against the coronavirus.

While large gatherings are still banned, and schools remain closed, some nonessential businesses were allowed to open in Accra and Kumasi, the two main metropolitan areas in the country. Ghana’s President Nana Akufo-Addo said his decision came about after increasing the country’s capacity to fight the pandemic, including aggressive contact tracing and expansion of testing. 

Ghana is using a unique approach to reduce the amount of time it takes to get COVID-19 test samples from remote rural areas to labs: drones. Instead of waiting for days for a batch of samples to be transported by truck, tests from rural areas can be delivered for analysis in less than an hour.

Related: COVID-19: The latest from The World 

The Ministry of Health expanded its partnership with Zipline, an American company that uses drones to deliver medical supplies. Zipline has set up a system to deliver samples collected in more than 1,000 health facilities across the country.

Zipline’s drones are automated, but they’re also being monitored and, when needed, controlled, by humans. On April 17, on Zipline’s first flight, 51 samples were flown from the Omenako drone distribution center to the Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research in Accra, 45 miles away, in what could be the first time that drones have been used to deliver COVID-19 test samples. 

The COVID-19 test samples are packed in special red boxes using guidelines issued by the World Health Organization and then placed inside the belly of the drone. The drone is then put on a launcher, and it’s off to its destination for delivery.

Zipline’s drones are automated but they’re also being monitored and, when needed, controlled, by humans.

Credit:

Courtesy of Zipline

The delivery is contactless. Once at the testing facility, the drone opens up its belly and drops the box filled with samples using a parachute to ease the landing. A health care worker sprays the box down with disinfectant and takes it inside to be processed. 

For nearly a year, Zipline has been delivering vaccines and medications to hospitals around Ghana. It also operates in Rwanda, where it uses its drones to deliver blood samples.

Wilmot James, a visiting professor at Columbia University who has advised the African Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on biosecurity, has been following Zipline’s operations for years and says the company has a clean track safety record. But he stressed that biosafety is critical in this kind of work and the fact that there is an inherent risk to these types of operations. 

“In this particular instance, we’re dealing with samples that are pathogenic,” James said. “An Ebola sample is another one; you have to make sure that you have proper protocols around that.”

Zipline says they’ve done that in consultation with experts and WHO. 

Ghana conducted more than 68,000 tests during lockdown, and some18,000 testing samples remain outstanding. The country has only  67 ventilators available in its public hospitals for a population of almost 30 million.

BROCKHAMPTON – QUEER lyrics

[Verse 1: Matt Champion]
Skinny boy, skinny boy, where your muscles at?
Used to walk to work, eight hours, take the bus back
Ain’t no time to stop, ain’t no time for vacation
Y’all all want my spot ’cause you know that I am A1
All these pretty girls, they come runnin’ to our faces
I could do without, I could move without, I could do myself
I get in a rut, I feel depressed, I bang on my chest
I say fuck ’em all ’til I’m dead

[Verse 2: Merlyn Wood]
First off, fuck Dolce & Gabbana
Racist mothersuckers tryna be my pana
Put that on me auntie and me mama
Grab the Ghost then I go right back to Ghana
I came back again, with the platinum
To the continent, I came back again
I came back again, with the platinum
To the continent, I came back again

[Pre-Chorus: Matt Champion & Kevin Abstract]
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth (Watch your lip, baby)
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth (W-w-watch your lip, baby)
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth (Watch your lip, baby)
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth (W-w-watch your lip, baby)

[Chorus: Kevin Abstract & Ryan Beatty]
And Waco is far away, I don’t even mind
As long as you stay right here, right next to my side
And Waco is far away, I don’t even mind
As long as you stay right here, right next to my side

[Verse 3: Dom McLennon]
Got a lot of things to say that I could never finish
Told my mama, “I’ll be back, just gotta kill another mission”
Gimme thirty seconds and I’ll make off with a billion
Every verse a heist for all your underlying feelings
Got canaries on the window, smell like roses on the ceiling
Oh what a–, oh what a–, oh, how appealing
Candy paint revealing all that bullshit you concealing
Fuck what you been hearing, I’m everything they fearing
I’m black and smart and sexy, universally appealing
Genius what I’m dealing, something they ain’t stealing
They prohibited the potents, might give you cirrhosis
Spaceship doing donuts, it’s written I’m the POTUS
I’m focused

[Pre-Chorus: Matt Champion & Kevin Abstract]
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth (Watch your lip, baby)
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth (W-w-watch your lip, baby)
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth (Watch your lip, baby)
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth
Don’t go runnin’ your mouth (W-w-watch your lip, baby)

[Chorus: Kevin Abstract & Ryan Beatty]
And Waco is far away, I don’t even mind
As long as you stay right here, right next to my side
And Waco is far away, I don’t even mind
As long as you stay right here, right next to my side

[Verse 4: Ameer Vann]
Barre Baby, spilled syrup on my big wheel
You could call me lil nigga with the big crib
My lifestyle still the same, just a face lift
Silly niggas got me running outta patience
My whole life slowly turned into a daydream
I hit the bank with a smile on my face, man
Pretty women always pullin’ at my waistband
Used to get arrested, all I get is checks now

[Chorus: Kevin Abstract & Ryan Beatty]
And Waco is far away, I don’t even mind
As long as you stay right here, right next to my side
And Waco is far away, I don’t even mind
As long as you stay right here, right next to my side
And Waco is far away, I don’t even mind
As long as you stay right here, right next to my side
And Waco is far away, I don’t even mind
As long as you stay right here, right next to my side

Vic Mensa – We Could Be Free

[Intro]
We could be free
If we only knew we were slaves to the pains of each other
One thing I believe I could learn
To see my enemy as my brother
Then we could be free, truly
And love could wash away our sorrows
I’m not afraid to bleed
If it means, we’ll make them better today not tomorrow

[Verse 1]
One day I dream of telling my momma
"You ain’t gotta work no more"
Same for my father, born in Ghana, down on that dirt road floor
As far as he came I can’t complain, but pain is so subjective
Spend so much time countin’ issues, I forget to count
My blessings
Watch my cousins back at home, getting water out a well
While I watch my brother stacking stone, whippin’ water by the scale
Tryna’ get a mill’ on the other side
They ain’t got a meal, we don’t recognize we in heaven
So we think we live in hell
It’s been getting kinda hard to tell
But

[Bridge]
Sometimes I wake up and I look up at the sky
Asking why I’m alive when the realest niggas died
And my pride won’t let me give up, lord as hard as I try
In those times I try to remember

[Hook]
That we could be free
If we only knew we were slaves to the pains of each other
One day, I believe I’d learn
To see my enemy as my brother
Then we could be free, truly
And love could wash away our sorrows
I’m not afraid to bleed
If it means, we’ll make them better today not tomorrow

[Verse 2]
I don’t want to wait for the afterlife
I don’t want a vigil by candle light
I don’t want to be the new sacrifice
I don’t want to turn into a poltergeist
Be a ghost at night full of broken dreams
Momma cryin’ at an open casket
Cold as ice in a suit, 3 piece
All dressed up for Sunday masses
Pastor said put faith in God
But faith alone can’t make things right
Who the fuck is you to patronize
Somebody’s son whose daddy died?
Why they flood Baton Rouge?
Why the city singing Alton’s blues?
Why, why, why, why?
I feel like Jadakiss every time I watch the news
What the fuck I got to lose?
So I’m down to bleed if it means things improve
You fools, saying "all lives matter"
But it’s black lives you refuse include
Blocked from the polls
Locked in the hood, trying to stop you from voting and stop you from growing
And cops keep blowing and blowing
Keep black people locked into cotton
They don’t want you to own, but

[Bridge]
Sometimes I wake up and I look up in the sky
Asking why I survived all the days that I could have died
Who am I in my place
To contemplate suicide?
In those times I try to remember

[Hook]
That we could be free, truly
If we’d only knew we were slaves to the pains of each other
But I believe I’d learn
To see my enemy as my brother
Then we could be free, you and me
And we could wash away our sorrows
I’m not afraid to bleed, if it means
We’ll make them better today not tomorrow

[Outro: Ty Dolla $ign and Vic Mensa]
Love (love)
Love (love)
To love my enemy as my brother
(yeah yeah yeah)
Make my enemy my brother
Woah, oh, oh, oh
Enemy my brother

Vic Mensa – We Could Be Free (On The Late Show) (Live)

[Intro]
We could be free
If we only knew we were slaves to the pains of each other
One thing I believe I could learn
To see my enemy as my brother
Then we could be free, truly
And love could wash away our sorrows
I’m not afraid to bleed
If it means, we’ll make them better today not tomorrow

[Verse 1]
One day I dream of telling my momma
"You ain’t gotta work no more"
Same for my father, born in Ghana, down on that dirt road floor
As far as he came I can’t complain, but pain is so subjective
Spend so much time countin’ issues, I forget to count
My blessings
Watch my cousins back at home, getting water out a well
While I watch my brother stacking stone, whippin’ water by the scale
Tryna’ get a mill’ on the other side
They ain’t got a meal, we don’t recognize we in heaven
So we think we live in hell
It’s been getting kinda hard to tell
But

[Bridge]
Sometimes I wake up and I look up at the sky
Asking why I’m alive when the realest niggas died
And my pride won’t let me give up, lord as hard as I try
In those times I try to remember

[Hook]
That we could be free
If we only knew we were slaves to the pains of each other
One day, I believe I’d learn
To see my enemy as my brother
Then we could be free, truly
And love could wash away our sorrows
I’m not afraid to bleed
If it means, we’ll make them better today not tomorrow

[Verse 2]
I don’t want to wait for the afterlife
I don’t want a vigil by candle light
I don’t want to be the new sacrifice
I don’t want to turn into a poltergeist
Be a ghost at night full of broken dreams
Momma cryin’ at an open casket
Cold as ice in a suit, 3 piece
All dressed up for Sunday masses
Pastor said put faith in God
But faith alone can’t make things right
Who the fuck is you to patronize
Somebody’s son whose daddy died?
Why they flood Baton Rouge?
Why the city singing Alton’s blues?
Why, why, why, why?
I feel like Jadakiss every time I watch the news
What the fuck I got to lose?
So I’m down to bleed if it means things improve
You fools, saying "all lives matter"
But it’s black lives you refuse include
Blocked from the polls
Locked in the hood, trying to stop you from voting and stop you from growing
And cops keep blowing and blowing
Keep black people locked into cotton
They don’t want you to own, but

[Bridge]
Sometimes I wake up and I look up in the sky
Asking why I survived all the days that I could have died
Who am I in my place
To contemplate suicide?
In those times I try to remember

[Hook]
That we could be free, truly
If we’d only knew we were slaves to the pains of each other
But I believe I’d learn
To see my enemy as my brother
Then we could be free, you and me
And we could wash away our sorrows
I’m not afraid to bleed, if it means
We’ll make them better today not tomorrow

[Outro: Ty Dolla $ign and Vic Mensa]
Love (love)
Love (love)
To love my enemy as my brother
(yeah yeah yeah)
Make my enemy my brother
Woah, oh, oh, oh
Enemy my brother

Vic Mensa – We Could Be Free (On BBC Radio 1’s Piano Sessions) (Live)

[Intro]
We could be free
If we only knew we were slaves to the pains of each other
One thing I believe I could learn
To see my enemy as my brother
Then we could be free, truly
And love could wash away our sorrows
I’m not afraid to bleed
If it means, we’ll make them better today not tomorrow

[Verse 1]
One day I dream of telling my momma
"You ain’t gotta work no more"
Same for my father, born in Ghana, down on that dirt road floor
As far as he came I can’t complain, but pain is so subjective
Spend so much time countin’ issues, I forget to count
My blessings
Watch my cousins back at home, getting water out a well
While I watch my brother stacking stone, whippin’ water by the scale
Tryna’ get a mill’ on the other side
They ain’t got a meal, we don’t recognize we in heaven
So we think we live in hell
It’s been getting kinda hard to tell
But

[Bridge]
Sometimes I wake up and I look up at the sky
Asking why I’m alive when the realest niggas died
And my pride won’t let me give up, lord as hard as I try
In those times I try to remember

[Hook]
That we could be free
If we only knew we were slaves to the pains of each other
One day, I believe I’d learn
To see my enemy as my brother
Then we could be free, truly
And love could wash away our sorrows
I’m not afraid to bleed
If it means, we’ll make them better today not tomorrow

[Verse 2]
I don’t want to wait for the afterlife
I don’t want a vigil by candle light
I don’t want to be the new sacrifice
I don’t want to turn into a poltergeist
Be a ghost at night full of broken dreams
Momma cryin’ at an open casket
Cold as ice in a suit, 3 piece
All dressed up for Sunday masses
Pastor said put faith in God
But faith alone can’t make things right
Who the fuck is you to patronize
Somebody’s son whose daddy died?
Why they flood Baton Rouge?
Why the city singing Alton’s blues?
Why, why, why, why?
I feel like Jadakiss every time I watch the news
What the fuck I got to lose?
So I’m down to bleed if it means things improve
You fools, saying "all lives matter"
But it’s black lives you refuse include
Blocked from the polls
Locked in the hood, trying to stop you from voting and stop you from growing
And cops keep blowing and blowing
Keep black people locked into cotton
They don’t want you to own, but

[Bridge]
Sometimes I wake up and I look up in the sky
Asking why I survived all the days that I could have died
Who am I in my place
To contemplate suicide?
In those times I try to remember

[Hook]
That we could be free, truly
If we’d only knew we were slaves to the pains of each other
But I believe I’d learn
To see my enemy as my brother
Then we could be free, you and me
And we could wash away our sorrows
I’m not afraid to bleed, if it means
We’ll make them better today not tomorrow

[Outro: Ty Dolla $ign and Vic Mensa]
Love (love)
Love (love)
To love my enemy as my brother
(yeah yeah yeah)
Make my enemy my brother
Woah, oh, oh, oh
Enemy my brother

Swamp – Brockhampton lyrics

Lyrics Brockhampton – Swamp

I could be here all day. You’re gonna tell me what I need to know. You’re gonna tell me. Are you gonna tell me? Come on, spit it out
Me Ilamo Roberto y este es el camino al éxito.(swamp)

F*cking commas up from the outside, from the outside, from the outside
F*cking dollas up from the outside, from the outside, from the outside
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?.

My daddy taught me how to sell dope, turn grams into elbows
Light it up when the L rolled, black man used to kick doors
Window bullets in the guns though, niggas still never argue
Raid the house like the task force, me and my niggas like drug dogs
Find the dope and we take off, f**k my girl with my chain on
b*tch, you tatted my name on it, yellow stone I was raised on it
Activis in my baby bottle, baby stroller was an Impala
Niggas like to talk down on me, when I see ’em I don’t hear about it.

F*cking commas up from the outside, from the outside, from the outside
F*cking dollas up from the outside, from the outside, from the outside
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?.

Never would’ve have met my friends if not for satellites
Yeah I’ll cuff her even if she do not suck me right
Always planned to be a rapper when I failed at life
Luckily professor failed me at the proper time
Chh-chh, chh, I say please all the time, b*tch
Chh-chh, chh, I like white collar crime, b*tch
Chh-chh, chh, money digital broke and
Chh-chh, chh, Ghana prince in your messages.

My daddy hate me for leavin’ then lets go crazy together
When I tell ya all the things that I’m thinking so that we could get better
But you wanna put my heart on the stretcher
I don’t got insurance for this pressure
Wanna find the benefits, I can’t measure
Try not to run out on my temper
I can see the ash and the ember
That was made from emotional texture
I don’t know why I took this endeavor
Non-identified with our presence
Non-identified we’ll surrender
All of my old friends fair-weather
Gotta treat my heart like a treasure, ’cause all I know is no one else will.

F*cking commas up from the outside, from the outside, from the outside
F*cking dollas up from the outside, from the outside, from the outside
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?.

You do not know me
Don’t speak of my homies
You are a phony
Versuri-lyrics.info
Quit pinning s**t on me
You gon’ bring out the old me
You don’t wanna know what I wanna do when y’all talk down on my name
I don’t wanna see you in the street ’cause I might catch a case
People smile when they face to face (woo, woo, woo!)
Then turn their back and switch up words you say (ah, ah, ah!)
Running to the papers everyday (woo, woo, woo!)
I’m running to the paper anyway (ah, ah, ah!)(swamp)

F*cking commas up from the outside, from the outside, from the outside
F*cking dollas up from the outside, from the outside, from the outside
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?
They been talkin’ down on me, (huh) what ya say?.
Downnn.(swamp)
Brockhamton lyrics
Video Brockhampton

Vic Mensa – We Could Be Free (At Vevo) (Live)

[Intro]
We could be free
If we only knew we were slaves to the pains of each other
One thing I believe I could learn
To see my enemy as my brother
Then we could be free, truly
And love could wash away our sorrows
I’m not afraid to bleed
If it means, we’ll make them better today not tomorrow

[Verse 1]
One day I dream of telling my momma
"You ain’t gotta work no more"
Same for my father, born in Ghana, down on that dirt road floor
As far as he came I can’t complain, but pain is so subjective
Spend so much time countin’ issues, I forget to count
My blessings
Watch my cousins back at home, getting water out a well
While I watch my brother stacking stone, whippin’ water by the scale
Tryna’ get a mill’ on the other side
They ain’t got a meal, we don’t recognize we in heaven
So we think we live in hell
It’s been getting kinda hard to tell
But

[Bridge]
Sometimes I wake up and I look up at the sky
Asking why I’m alive when the realest niggas died
And my pride won’t let me give up, lord as hard as I try
In those times I try to remember

[Hook]
That we could be free
If we only knew we were slaves to the pains of each other
One day, I believe I’d learn
To see my enemy as my brother
Then we could be free, truly
And love could wash away our sorrows
I’m not afraid to bleed
If it means, we’ll make them better today not tomorrow

[Verse 2]
I don’t want to wait for the afterlife
I don’t want a vigil by candle light
I don’t want to be the new sacrifice
I don’t want to turn into a poltergeist
Be a ghost at night full of broken dreams
Momma cryin’ at an open casket
Cold as ice in a suit, 3 piece
All dressed up for Sunday masses
Pastor said put faith in God
But faith alone can’t make things right
Who the fuck is you to patronize
Somebody’s son whose daddy died?
Why they flood Baton Rouge?
Why the city singing Alton’s blues?
Why, why, why, why?
I feel like Jadakiss every time I watch the news
What the fuck I got to lose?
So I’m down to bleed if it means things improve
You fools, saying "all lives matter"
But it’s black lives you refuse include
Blocked from the polls
Locked in the hood, trying to stop you from voting and stop you from growing
And cops keep blowing and blowing
Keep black people locked into cotton
They don’t want you to own, but

[Bridge]
Sometimes I wake up and I look up in the sky
Asking why I survived all the days that I could have died
Who am I in my place
To contemplate suicide?
In those times I try to remember

[Hook]
That we could be free, truly
If we’d only knew we were slaves to the pains of each other
But I believe I’d learn
To see my enemy as my brother
Then we could be free, you and me
And we could wash away our sorrows
I’m not afraid to bleed, if it means
We’ll make them better today not tomorrow

[Outro: Ty Dolla $ign and Vic Mensa]
Love (love)
Love (love)
To love my enemy as my brother
(yeah yeah yeah)
Make my enemy my brother
Woah, oh, oh, oh
Enemy my brother

Wizkid – African Bad Gyal (feat. Chris Brown) (Sounds From The Other Side Album)

Yeah, StarBoy
Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah
Let me hear you say, yeah, yeah
Sarz on the beat
Yaga
Them no born me yesterday
Every gyal, want designer
Them no born me yesterday
I know say your love will cost me something
Girl you dey do me something something
Ee dey do me like you gonna
I see the fire, bring the rice
Burnin’ like a cigarette
Baby girl are you from Ghana?
Or you coming from Somalia?
Ah you coming from Uganda?
Or you’re coming from Nigeria?
African bad gyal
Baby, don’t change your style
Girl, I love you the way you are
The way you are
Feeling the dancing, gan
Sarz on the beat, gan
Feeling the dancing, gan
Starboy kill the beat, yeah, ayy
Them no born me yesterday
Be a freaky girl and whine up
I put my hand up on the waist
Baby girl, you are the one, oh
Ooh, baby, you you got something
Gimme, gimme all of your love, I want it
Baby girl, stop with all the fronting
The way you dance, I know you want this
Baby girl, you from Angola
Sister from South Africa
Pretty girl, I wanna hold ya
Shout out to my ladies in Nigeria
African bad girl
Baby, don’t change your style
Girl, I love you the way you are
The way you are
Feeling the dancing, gan
Sarz on the beat, gan, yeah, yeah
Feeling the dancing, gan, yeah, yeah
Star Boy kill the beat, yeah, ayy
Say, if you like Galala, make you dance
Say if you like Konto, make you dance
Say if you like this or if you like that
Say you like bouncin’, make you bounce
Say, if you like galala, make you dance
Say if you like Konto, make you dance
Say if you like this or if you like that
Say you like bouncin’, make you bounce
I love the things you do to me, I feel alright
I love the feeling, that I feel, I’m feelin’ nice
I love the things you do to me, I feel alright
You give me life, you give me life, you give me life
See, baby gyal, please, baby gyal jo fun mi
Omoge jo fun mi
Wit’ your sexy body, yeah, wit’ your sexy body
Baby gyal, please, baby gyal jo fun mi
Omoge jo fun mi
Wit’ your sexy body, yeah, wit’ your sexy body
African bad gyal
Baby, don’t change your style
Girl, I love you the way you are
The way you are
Feeling the dancing gan, yeah, yeah
Sarz on the beat gan, yeah, yeah
Feeling the dancing gan, yeah
Star Boy kill the beat, yeah, ay
Yeah

African bad gyal – Wizkid feat. Chris Brown lyrics

Lyrics Wizkid – African bad gyal

Them no born me yesterday
Evrey gyal, want designer
Them no born me yesterday
I know say your love will cost me something
Girl you dey do me something something
Ee dey do me like igbana
I see the fire, bring the rice
Burnin’ like a cigarette
Baby girl are you from Ghana?
Or you coming from Somalia?
Ah you coming from Uganda?
Or you’re coming from Nigeria?(african bad gyal)

African bad gyal
Baby, don’t change your style
Girl, I love you the way you are
The way you are.

Feeling the dancing, gan
Sarz on the beat, gan
Feeling the dancing, gan
Starboy kill the beat, yeah, ayyy.

Them no born me yesterday
Be a freaky girl and whine up
I put my hand up on the waist
Baby girl, you are the one, oh
Oooh, baby, you you got something
Gimme, gimme all of your love, I want it
Baby girl, stop with all the fronting
The way you dance, I know you want this
Baby girl, you from Angola
Sister from South Africa
Pretty girl, I wanna hold ya
Shout out to my ladies in Nigeria.

African bad girl
Baby, don’t change your style
Girl, I love you the way you are
The way you are.

Feeling the dancing, gan
Sarz on the beat, gan
Feeling the dancing, gan
Star Boy kill the beat, yeah, ayy.

Say, if you like Galala, make you dance
Say if you like Konto, make you dance
Say if you like this or if you like that
Say you like bouncin’, make you bounce
Say, if you like galala, make you dance
Say if you like Konto, make you dance
Say if you like this or if you like that
Say you like bouncin’, make you bounce.

I love the things you do to me, I feel alright
I love the feeling, that I feel, I’m feelin’ nice
I love the things you do to me, I feel alright
You give me life, you give me life, you give me life
See, baby gyal, please, baby gyal jo fun mi
Omoge jo fun mi versuri-lyrics.info
Wit’ your sexy body, yeah, wit’ your sexy body
Baby gyal, please, baby gyal jo fun mi
Omoge jo fun mi
Wit’ your sexy body, yeah, wit’ your sexy body.

African bad girl
Baby, don’t change your style
Girl, I love you the way you are
The way you are.

Feeling the dancing gan, yeah, yeah
Sarz on the beat gan, yeah, yeah
Feeling the dancing gan, yeah
Star Boy kill the beat, yeah, ayyy.
Wizkid lyrics
Video gyal

Eno – Fuchs (Xalaz Album)

[Part 1: Eno]
Du willst ein Foto, aber ich finde dein face gay
Du willst Haze, aber kriegst Stanni mit Hazespray
Du willst Benz fahren, ach mach mal langsam
Eno ist der King im Revier wie ein Aslan
Das ist erst der Anfang, druff auf black Afghan
Unsere Völker sind die, die Steine werfen auf Panzer
Sei froh, dass du ein Stück Brot frisst, wozu
Soll ich Angst haben, wenn es den Tod gibt?
Absinken, Wellritzstraße in der Einfahrt
Grüße, alle meine Jungs aus der Heimat
Sippis, die auf krass machen wollen
Sind auf einmal leise, wenn sie meine Hand küssen sollen
Große Fressen, aber leider nichts dahinter
Schieben, krassere Filme als Inder
Biri min, ich bin da, zeig mir die Pisser
Erst, fliegen Jabs und danach fliegen schwinger

[Hook: Eno]
Freitagsgebet, erste Reihe masha allah
Doch ein paar Stunden später siehst du, wie er Hash ballert
Fuchs Bruder, ich hab’ Augen überall
Der Teufel in mir flüstert: „Es ist Zeit für ein’n Überfall!“

[Bridge: Eno]
Fuchsbrudi, Fuchsbrudi, 183 bin ein Fuchsbrudi
Fuchsbrudi, Fuchsbrudi, 183 bin ein Fuchsbrudi
Fuchsbrudi, Fuchsbrudi, 183 bin ein Fuchsbrudi
Fuchsbrudi, Fuchsbrudi, 183 bin ein Fuchsbrudi

[Part 2: Eno]
Sitze, mit der Shisha, auf dem Balkon
Und träume von einem Koenigsegg in Carbon
Ich bin ganz unten, doch komme bald Hoch
Und hinterlasse Kunstwerke, so wie Van Gogh
Ich peitsch’ dich, mit der Gucci-Gürtelschnalle
Ein, Fuchsbrudi tappt nicht zweimal in die selbe Falle
Muck auf, markier ruhig den Held, was Rücken?
Ich vertrau nur mir selbst
Komme mit Kurdis oder Reshos aus Ghana
Bei Beef, verschwindest du wie Menschen in Tijuana
Bist drauf auf Ijuana
Ich hau’ dir deine Zähne raus
Platz eins Brudi, so sehen meine Pläne aus
Drogen ticken ist die Thematik der Deutschrapper
Bei dir läuft, aber Brate bei mir läuft besser
Ich geh’ auf die Straße, um Patte zu verdien’n
Du gehst auf die Straße, um Pokemon zu spielen

[Hook: Eno]
Freitagsgebet, erste Reihe masha allah
Doch ein paar Stunden später siehst du, wie er Hash ballert
Fuchs Bruder, ich hab’ Augen überall
Der Teufel in mir flüstert: „Es ist Zeit für ein’n Überfall!“

[Bridge: Eno]
Fuchsbrudi, Fuchsbrudi, 183 bin ein Fuchsbrudi
Fuchsbrudi, Fuchsbrudi, 183 bin ein Fuchsbrudi
Fuchsbrudi, Fuchsbrudi, 183 bin ein Fuchsbrudi
Fuchsbrudi, Fuchsbrudi, 183 bin ein Fuchsbrudi

Tech N9ne – No Runnin To Ya Mama (The Storm Deluxe Edition Album)

Yeah, you must be throw’d
You gon’ make them thangs come up out that load
You ain’t built like that but you talk so cold
Yeah, we know

Hurts now, purps found cause a nigga squirt rounds
Acting like ya wore a purse on turf grounds
Like how his homies didn’t tell him to pull his skirt down
Now look at’cha
Loud mouth we found a round to match ya
Bound to smack ya, not a ground to catch ya
Cause you frowned at the hounds and you found disaster
He talking hella shady
How I get it on the daily
They jelly bout my gravy but they crazy cause they think I won’t be banging like the 80s
Your homie was a movie
So we [?] him with the tooly
Got his family sick and woozy giving him the finger [?] and Joe Cooley
They hot around the collar
Cause I got a lot of shotters
So don’t nobody bother, if they try to then we stoppin’ they medulla oblongata
So be careful when you saucing
You could end up in the coffin
You better take precaution when you see real niggas crossing, shut the fuck up when we talking
If you get my killers heated
You’ll be curled up like a fetus
All them words, you’re gonna eat it
Every fist and all the feet is never ceasing when you pleaded
So I think you better comma
Or get lit up with the llama
KC all the way to Ghana, when you grown and start the drama, ain’t no running to yo mama, nigga

x2
No running to yo mama
When you caught up in the drama
No running to yo mama when you caught up in the drama cause you did nobody honor

We the boss players
In this, industry and not SEGA
Nigga we are stop haters
We take ’em to the end and then it’s viva las vegas
If you tripping, y’all nuts
Cause we sick and all bust
So get the motherfucking pineapple, the rum and the coconut and mix it all up
We coming from the ghetto
And we keep the heavy metal
So you suckers better settle cause we turn a wolf and devil to a woman in stilettos
Cause they didn’t really want it
They was only in the moment
Hella talking, never on it
Had they’re chance and now they blown it cause the king was their opponent
He bit the hand that fed him
Run you over if you let him
All the homies wanna get him, heard the words when he said them now I know that he regret them
Cause we be getting money
And he be looking bummy
So keep the coward from me, when you see me don’t be chummy
Muh’fucking dumby
I know you can’t stand me
But you know that we go hammy
Have you sleeping like a xanny, hit them with a super whammy when I cut them from the family
We in every nook and cranny
Hit you when you’re in your jammies, when you’re in your manny panties
See me and my brother Sammy, ain’t no yelling for your granny and no running to your mammy nigga

x2
No running to yo mama
When you caught up in the drama
No running to yo mama when you caught up in the drama cause you did nobody honor

Bonez MC & RAF Camora – Ohne mein Team (English Translation) Lyrics

[Bridge: Bonez MC]
In a group of six in the Mercedes, because all guys have to come along
A little bit of champagne for the girls and a fuck as a result
No law, no rules – let’s make bucks
Because it’s a good life like that – but never without my team

[Verse 1: RAF Camora]
I close the door of the apartment, when the party is complete
Monika, Sarah, Belinda from Instagram on my guest list
Menthol in the cigarette, soda in the drink
A chick wants that I sing “So lala” for her
She want’s me intimate
I don’t cooperate without my team
The sun shines through the curtain
Skin color: Ovolmaltine
Cocaine in the booth two by two
Death has distributed the death papers
Today, all my arabs are latinos
„Chica, ¿qué pasa?“; the boys are amigos
She passes the joint, let’s the homies hit it
Smoking – never without my team

[Hook]
Never without – without my team, never without – without my team
Hamburg, Berlin, West Vienna – never without – without my team
Never without – without my team, never without – without my team
Hamburg, Berlin, West Vienna – never without – without my team

[Post-Chorus: RAF Camora & Bonez MC]
Pop, pop – not at twelve o’clock, but at one o’clock is okay
One yalan, two yalan – at one o’clock is okay
A glass of Yamazaki – not at twelve, but at one o’clock is okay
A party everyday

[Part 2: Maxwell]
Don’t enter the stage, not without my team
Nobody takes our philosophy from us
Everything numb – lidocaine
Don’t ask, how much money I make out of a kilo
One chick to the left, one chick to the right
See you at the Echo – guest list of Maxwell
Bring me the rum, a case of the best one
Don’t need a hotel, baby, fuck backstage
What happens today will be suppressed tomorrow
Let the sun burn me at the beach
They bring the cops, I bring the gang
When it comes to violence, we are too consequent
All people from Ghana are Brazilians today
Prince Boateng from the Copacabana
Next level coma, the drugs are clean
All of them want to serve me topless, but never without my team!

[Hook]
Never without – without my team, never without – without my team
Hamburg, Berlin, West Vienna – never without – without my team
Never without – without my team, never without – without my team
Hamburg, Berlin, West Vienna – never without – without my team

[Post-Chorus: RAF Camora & Bonez MC]
Pop, pop – not at twelve o’clock, but at one o’clock is okay
One yalan, two yalan – at one o’clock is okay
A glass of Yamazaki – not at twelve, but at one o’clock is okay
A party everyday

[Bridge: Bonez MC]
In a group of six in the Mercedes, because all guys have to come along
A little bit of champagne for the girls and a fuck as a result
No law, no rules – let’s make bucks
Because it’s a good life like that – but never without my team

[Post-Chorus: RAF Camora & Bonez MC]
Pop, pop – not at twelve o’clock, but at one o’clock is okay
One yalan, two yalan – at one o’clock is okay
A glass of Yamazaki – not at twelve, but at one o’clock is okay
A party everyday

[Outro]
Hey, hey, hey, hey; hey, hey, he-e-ey
Hey, hey, hey, hey; hey, hey, he-e-ey
Hey, hey, hey, hey; hey, hey, he-e-ey
Hey, hey, hey, hey; hey, hey, he-e-ey