Apple pie samosas for Thanksgiving? In East Africa, these fried treats are a hit.

class=”MuiTypography-root-133 MuiTypography-h1-138″>Apple pie samosas for Thanksgiving? In East Africa, these fried treats are a hit.

Aleya Kassam, one of the founders of Wau Eats in Nairobi, said her family has enjoyed making samosas for generations. As they experiment with different fillings, Americans living in Kenya are even ordering apple pie samosas for Thanksgiving.

The WorldNovember 24, 2021 · 3:30 PM EST

Rows of fresh Wau Eats samosas waiting to be packed and delivered to eager customers, Nairobi, Kenya, Nov. 23, 2021.

Halima Gikandi/The World

The humble samosa. When you think of it, your thoughts might drift toward India or the Middle East.

But here in East Africa, from Kenya to Somalia to Uganda — people like to think of samosas as their own thing.

“Everyone thinks the samosa is theirs,” laughed Aleya Kassam, one of the founders of Wau Eats, a family-owned samosa company in Nairobi.

While some research has placed the origins of samosas in Central Asia, they’ve since become a fixture of street food across East Africa.

"It’s the perfect travel food."

Aleya Kassam, one of the founders of Wau Eats

“It’s the perfect travel food, right?" Kassam said. "It’s a little pocket that you can put anything into, and then fry.”

Related: Turkey’s eastern Van region serves up sheep’s milk cheese — the traditional way

For Kassam, the very aroma of samosas takes her back to her childhood.

“Our house always smelled of fried onions because beef samosas always have the onions and, you know, the mixture being made,” she said.

“We would just be sitting there chatting and folding samosas, and you would just see the piles of triangles grow and grow and grow.”

Aleya Kassam and her brother, Irfan Kassam, outside of their family business, Wau Eats, Nairobi, Kenya, Nov. 23, 2021.

Credit:

Halima Gikandi/The World

Samosas have been an on-and-off business for Kassam’s family for generations.

“My grandparents, back when they lived in Tanzania, used to own a bakery. And my grandfather would make the bread and my grandmother would make the samosas.”

They built their business one samosa at a time. Until they lost everything after Tanzania nationalized, leading her grandparents to set up shop in neighboring Kenya.

Tragically, things went wrong again in the 1990s, when a bank with all of the family's savings collapsed.

“We lost everything. Three generations of every single coin that we had saved. And as we were sitting around, two years ago, thinking, ‘What on earth are we going to do? How do we pick ourselves up again?’ We decided, "Well, maybe samosas are the way." And that was the beginning of Wau Eats."

Related: Ice cream is becoming hugely popular in China, as shops experiment with sweet — and savory — flavors

But running a business during a pandemic isn’t easy.

So, Kassam and her family did what a lot of businesses in Kenya did. They turned to social media to spread the word about their new enterprise.

"It was really every box of samosas that was ordered that made [our co] possible,”

Aleya Kassam, one of the founders of Wau Eats

“Honestly, the fact that we even exist is because Kenyans on Twitter said, ‘We want to give you a chance.’ It was really every box of samosas that was ordered that made us possible,” Kassam said.

Now, nearly two years on, Wau Eats has become a hit.

A Wau Eat employee fills mutton samosas, Nairobi, Kenya, Nov. 23, 2021.

Credit:

Halima Gikandi/The World

It even got a shoutout from Kenya’s President Uhuru Kenyatta last year.

Related: Gyro is the ‘holy grail’ of Greek fast food. An Athens restaurant offers a vegan alternative.

But Wau’s popularity has also been driven, in large part, by experimentation. These days, its menu, still advertised on Twitter, boasts more than a dozen creative flavors of samosas: feta, nyam chom (short for nyama choma — a style of roasted meat in Kenya), chocolate, coconut, dates and apple pie.

We found, a lot of our American clients want apple pie samosas for Thanksgiving on Thursday. So, they're super excited about that, kind of, nostalgia … home taste.”

Talking turkey! How the Thanksgiving bird got its name (and then lent it to film flops).

class=”MuiTypography-root-125 MuiTypography-h1-130″>Talking turkey! How the Thanksgiving bird got its name (and then lent it to film flops).

From "turkey trot" to "going cold turkey," the centerpiece to many Thanksgiving dinners has lent its name to many things. But it also borrowed its name from elsewhere.

November 24, 2021 · 2:30 PM EST

Not everyone is a fan of Turkey Day. 

E4C via Getty Images

“Meleagris Gallopavo Day” is a bit of a mouthful. Which may be why this Thanksgiving, most people will opt for the less ornithologically precise “Turkey Day.”

And just as turkey is a versatile meat — think of those leftover options! — so too is the word “turkey,” which can refer to everything from the bird itself to a populous Eurasian country to movie flops.

As a scholar who studies word origins, I love “talking turkey” — not only how the bird came to be named, but also how the word has evolved over time. But let’s start with what has become the centerpiece of most Thanksgiving Day dinners.

The North American turkey — the kind that many families will be carving up this Thanksgiving – was being domesticated in Mexico some 2,000 years ago.

Europeans glimpsed their first turkeys around 1500, when Spanish explorers arrived in the Americas and brought them back to the mother country. By the 1520s, turkeys were being bred in Spain, and soon the delicacy was appearing on rich people’s tables across Europe.

Oh, dinde!

But what to call the new import? Europeans in the New World were overwhelmed by the new plants and animals they saw, and often used familiar names for unfamiliar species. The Spanish, for instance, thought turkeys looked like peacocks, so they used the Spanish word pavos. The French called them poules d’Indes, or Indian chickens, later shortened to dinde.

To the English, the newly discovered American birds looked like the guineafowl — a bird native to Africa but which was introduced into Europe by Arab and Turkish traders in the 14th and 15th centuries.

And it is this point in the story that the modern-day turkey gets its name.

The Ottoman Empire was then at its height. Ethnic Turks, based in Constantinople (now Istanbul), ran the empire that spanned the Near East, Middle East and North Africa. As a result, to many Europeans, anyone from “the East” was a “Turk.”

Because Ottomans dominated trade in the eastern Mediterranean, a lot of produce coming to Europe was seen as “Turkish.” So a precious stone from Persia was named “Turkey stone,” and the French version of that name, “pierre turquoise,” gave us the word “turquoise.”

In the same way, African guineafowl, introduced by Turkish traders, became a “turkey-cock” or “turkey-hen.” Over time, this was shortened to just “turkey.”

Now that’s a feast!

For as long as the New World turkeys have been in Europe, they’ve been featured in celebratory meals. The English word first appears in print in an account of a banquet hosted by politician John Prideaux in 1555: The menu included 38 red deer, 43 pheasants, 50 quince pies, 63 swans, 114 pigeons, 120 rabbits, 840 larks, 325 gallons of Bordeaux wine and “Turkies 2. rated at 4s. a piece.”

History’s most famous turkey dinner, though, was served in Plymouth Plantation in 1621, as 50 Pilgrims who survived a year of brutal hardship joined 90 Native Americans for a three-day feast. Turkey wasn’t the only dish being served. Writing in his History of Plymouth Plantation, Governor William Bradford noted that Native Americans brought “codd, & bass, & other fish,” and others brought “water foule” and venison. But he was especially impressed with the “great store of wild Turkies.”

The bird has become so associated with harvest-time celebratory dinners that we’ve been calling Thanksgiving “Turkey Day” since at least 1870.

Meanwhile, the word has continued to find new uses, showing up with dozens of meanings. In 1839, the Southern Literary Messenger — a magazine edited by Edgar Allen Poe — reported on a new kind of dance, called the “turkey-trot” from its jerking motions.

In 1920, New York’s Department of Health reported that “Some addicts voluntarily stop taking opiates and ‘suffer it out’ … which in their slang is called taking ‘cold turkey.‘”

The turkey’s reputation for stupidity prompted other meanings. The legendary gossip columnist Walter Winchell told readers of Vanity Fair in 1927 about some new showbiz slang: “‘A turkey,’” he reported, “is a third rate production.”

Since then, movies that flop with the critics or at the box office have been called turkeys.

Another disparaging sense arrived in the 1950s, when turkey became a name for “a stupid, slow, inept, or otherwise worthless person.” That, in turn, probably led to the rise of the “jive turkey,” which first showed up in African American speech in the early 1970s, defined by slang lexicographer Jonathon Green as “an insincere, deceitful, dishonest person.”

Jive or straight talking?

And what about “talk turkey”? Well, that can mean quite contradictory things.

One dictionary from 1859 defines it as “To talk in a silly manner, talk nonsense.” A similar meaning is attached to another turkey-related word, “gobbledygook.”

Another definition found in the 1889 “Americanisms, Old & New” had “talking turkey” meaning “To use high-sounding words, when plain English would do equally well or better.”

The most familiar meaning of “talking turkey,” in which it is a stand-in for “straight talk,” is often said to come from a once popular joke. A white man and an American Indian, the story goes, spend a day hunting together and manage to bag a turkey and a somewhat less bountiful buzzard. The devious white man proposes a “heads-I-win-tails-you-lose” division of the spoils. “I’ll take the turkey, and you the buzzard,” he says, “or, if you prefer, you take the buzzard, and I’ll take the turkey.” The frustrated American Indian replies – usually in some version of would-be comic pidgin English – “You talk all buzzard to me, and don’t talk turkey.”

Those who study word histories are skeptical of stories like this, since most are invented after the fact. More likely, “talk turkey” came from pleasant conversation at Thanksgiving dinner, or maybe negotiations between Native Americans and European colonists over the cost of poultry. Whatever the origin, though, when we “talk turkey,” we’re engaging in the kind of straightforward, honest speech the scheming hunter denied his hunting partner.

Author Jack Lynch is a professor of English at Rutgers University — Newark. This article is republished from The Conversation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to unlocking the knowledge of experts for the public good. 

Sweden’s first female prime minister quits hours later

class=”MuiTypography-root-228 MuiTypography-h1-233″>Sweden's first female prime minister quits hours laterAssociated PressNovember 24, 2021 · 2:15 PM EST

Sweden's Minister of Finance Magdalena Andersson gestures, after being elected to party chairman of the Social Democratic Party at the party’s congress in Gothenburg, Sweden, Nov. 4, 2021.

Bjorn Larsson Rosvall/TT News Agency via AP/File photo

Hours after being tapped as Sweden’s first female prime minister, Magdalena Andersson resigned Wednesday after suffering a budget defeat in parliament and her coalition partner, the Greens Party, left the two-party minority government.

The government’s own budget proposal was rejected in favor of one presented by the opposition that includes the right-wing populist Sweden Democrats. Sweden’s third-largest party is rooted in a neo-Nazi movement. The vote was 154-143 in favor of the opposition’s budget proposal.

Andersson, leader of the Social Democratic party, decided it was best to step down from the post more than seven hours after she made history by becoming the first woman to lead the country.

”For me, it is about respect, but I also do not want to lead a government where there may be grounds to question its legitimacy,” Andersson told a news conference.

Andersson, who was finance minister before briefly becoming prime minister, informed parliamentary Speaker Andreas Norlen that she is still interested in leading a Social Democratic one-party government.

Norlen, the speaker of Sweden’s 349-seat parliament, said he will contact Sweden’s eight party leaders “to discuss the situation.” On Thursday, he will announce the road ahead.

Andersson said that “a coalition government should resign if a party chooses to leave the government. Despite the fact that the parliamentary situation is unchanged, it needs to be tried again."

Even though the Greens Party pulled its support for her government, it said it is prepared to stand behind Andersson in a new vote to tap a prime minister.

But the Greens said it was in the best interests of the party to pull support for her after the budget defeat in parliament.

“We have a united party behind us saying we can not sit in government that implements a policy (the Sweden Democrats) negotiated. We must look our voters in the eye and feel pride,” said Marta Stenevi, Greens Party spokesperson as the party chose to resign from the government.

The other Greens Party spokesperson Per Bolund said “that is something we deeply regret.”

Earlier in the day, Andersson said she could “govern the country with the opposition’s budget.”

The approved budget was based on the government’s own proposal, but of the $8.2 billion (74 billion kronor) that the government wanted to spend on reforms, just over $2.2 billion (20 billion kronor) will be redistributed next year, Swedish broadcaster SVT said. The approved budget aims at reducing taxes, increased salaries for police officers and more money to different sectors of Sweden’s judiciary system.

Andersson's appointment as prime minister had marked a milestone for Sweden, viewed for decades as one of Europe’s most progressive countries when it comes to gender relations, but which had yet to have a woman in the top political post.

Andersson had been tapped to replace Stefan Lofven as party leader and prime minister, roles he relinquished earlier this year.

Earlier in the day, 117 lawmakers voted yes to Andersson, 174 rejected her appointment while 57 abstained and one lawmaker was absent.

Under the Swedish Constitution, prime ministers can be named and govern as long as a parliamentary majority — a minimum of 175 lawmakers — is not against them.

Sweden’s next general election is scheduled for Sept. 11, 2022.

By Associated Press writer Jan M. Olsen

Discussion: Children’s mental health during COVID

class=”MuiTypography-root-228 MuiTypography-h1-233″>Discussion: Children's mental health during COVIDNovember 24, 2021 · 1:45 PM EST Updated on Nov. 24, 2021 · 1:45 PM EST

Children play with a therapist in the pediatric unit of the Robert Debre hospital, in Paris, France, March 2, 2021.

Christophe Ena/AP/File photo

The COVID-19 pandemic has taken a toll on populations across the globe. And for children, the past two years have been a significant part of their young lives, affecting everything from their social interactions to their physical and mental wellbeing.

UNICEF did an analysis of various studies on the mental health of tens of thousands of children and adolescents across 22 mostly high and upper middle-income countries — between November 2019 and November 2020 — and found “higher levels of depression, fear, anxiety, anger, irritability, negativity, conduct disorder, alcohol and substance use and sedentary behaviors, compared with pre-pandemic rates.”

Certain coping strategies, including having daily routines and regular physical activity, have helped buffer against depression and were associated with better moods. Good communication with loved ones also helped manage pandemic stressors and lockdowns.

Related discussion:A deepening coronavirus crisis in Latin America

Another factor that’s contributed to mental health pressures on households is financial insecurity. “Millions more families have been pushed into poverty, unable to make ends meet," UNICEF revealed in its own report published in October. "Child labor, abuse and gender-based violence are on the rise,” while investment in necessary resources “remains negligible.”

The report added that the coronavirus pandemic "has created serious concerns about the mental health of children and their families during lockdowns, and it has illustrated in the starkest light how events in the wider world can affect the world inside our heads," as well as highlighting "the fragility of support systems for mental health in many countries, and it has – once again – underlined how these hardships fall disproportionately on the most disadvantaged communities." It went on to add that the specific impacts of the pandemic on mental health could take years to be fully assessed.

Related discussion: A deepening coronavirus crisis in Brazil

An information sign is displayed as a child arrives with her parent to receive the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine for children 5 to 11-years-old at London Middle School in Wheeling, Ill., Nov. 17, 2021.

Credit:

Nam Y. Huh/AP/File photo

In the US, parents, teachers and other caretakers have tried to find creative ways to address the needs of children.

More than 20 public school districts have extended their Thanksgiving holiday breaks to include "wellness days" for their students and staff, giving them a chance to reconnect and recharge.

Earlier this month, on Nov. 2, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention approved the COVID-19 vaccine, produced by Pfizer-BioNTech, for children in the US between the ages of 5 and 11. The move allowed for more flexibility for kids to safely resume school and social activities.

Some American schools even used the windfall of federal coronavirus relief money to expand their capacity to address students’ mental health struggles, including problems like absenteeism, behavioral issues, and quieter signs of distress.

As part of The World's regular series of conversations about the pandemic, reporter Elana Gordon will moderate a discussion with Karestan Koenen, Professor of Psychiatric Epidemiology at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health on Monday, Nov. 29 at 12 p.m. Eastern time, to discuss these efforts and the challenges surrounding the mental health impacts of the pandemic on children.

Send in your questions for the discussion to [email protected]

The AP contributed to this report.

An underground network of locals in Poland self-organize to help migrants who face ‘pushbacks’ by the govt

class=”MuiTypography-root-133 MuiTypography-h1-138″>An underground network of locals in Poland self-organize to help migrants who face 'pushbacks' by the govt

Humanitarian groups and media have been banned from entering the area near the border with Belarus.

The WorldNovember 24, 2021 · 1:45 PM EST

A protest by mothers in the Polish eastern town of Hajnowka over the deaths of migrant children in the forest. 

Andrew Connelly/The World

For months, the government of Belarus has been accused of directing thousands of asylum-seekers to the border with Poland.

In response, the Polish authorities have sent thousands of troops to the border and amended legislation in October allowing them to "push back" migrants they catch. Most of the migrants come from Syria and Iraq.

“The Polish border is sealed. The Belarusian authorities told you lies. Go back to Minsk!”

Related: 'We cannot close the door or turn the page': Belarusian dissidents in Lithuania fear Lukashenko's crackdown

So reads the English-language text message sent by the Polish government to all foreign-registered phones, as soon as people approach the country’s eastern border with Belarus.

But an underground network of local people is self-organizing to help desperate people stranded in the vast Bialowieza Forest in Poland — the last remaining section of a gigantic primeval forest that used to stretch across the continent — and avoid these pushbacks by authorities. Humanitarian groups and media have been banned from entering the area.

The Bialowieza Forest is Europe's largest, forming part of a gigantic primeval forest that stretched across the continent.

Credit:

Andrew Connelly/The World

The fire station in the eastern town of Michalowo, Poland, has become a distribution point for donations for asylum-seekers making the treacherous journey through the forests. Shelves are piled high with food, clothes, diapers, medicine and toys. The volunteer firefighters hand out supplies to migrants they meet when on patrol.

Krzysiek, a firefighter in his 50s, stood over a mountain of bottled water in the center of the fire station.

“We don’t have a choice. We are on the front line. We have the space, we have the capacity, we’re not so old yet, so we still have the energy. And these people are in a bad situation.”

Krzysiek, firefighter

“We don’t have a choice,” Krzysiek said. “We are on the front line. We have the space, we have the capacity, we’re not so old yet, so we still have the energy. And these people are in a bad situation.”

At least 10 migrants have been found dead on the Belarusian border. Most recently, the youngest victim was a 1-year-old child from Syria.

Other community members are also getting involved.

Related: Afghan migrants remain stranded at Poland-Belarus border as leaders punt responsibility

Last weekend, a small demonstration by mothers in support of migrants was held in the nearby town of Hajnówka. They chanted, “The forest is not the place for children.”

Among them was high school teacher Kasia Wappa, who stood next to a box of portable phone chargers.

“We had a case a week ago where a man had no phone, because it was stolen from him, and he was dying by the road,” Wappa said. “Nobody even knew he was there, and he would have been another nameless victim of the border if it had not been for my friends who just picked him up from the grass.”

Rather than large aid agencies, who are banned from the forest, the humanitarian effort on the Belarusian border is largely led by ordinary Poles.

“Not long ago, we just [lived] our normal average lives,” Wappa said. “We were not activists, we were not nurses, we were not lawyers, we were not psychologists; and suddenly, we are all these things in one when we go to the forest.”

Oliwer Kruczek and two friends stood out with their bright orange paramedic uniforms. In the evening, they planned to join a patrol to give support to migrants in the forest.

“We wanted to join because we see the violation of the Geneva Convention, which all citizens of Poland should respect,” said Kruczek, who normally works in a barbershop. “I’m not saying we should accept everyone, but we have to do something to help; there are children in the forest.”

Related: Activists: Belarus Olympian plans to seek asylum in Poland

The Polish government has demarcated a 2-mile-wide area that runs parallel to the 250-milelong border of Belarus, where nobody — including journalists, doctors and activists — is allowed to enter, apart from residents.

A fire station run by volunteer firefighters in Michalowo, Poland, has become a distribution point for donations that activists deliver to migrants in the forest.

Credit:

Andrew Connelly/The World

One woman, who preferred not to use her name for security reasons, lives in this area that has become known as “the zone,” where migrants are bound to pass through.

“Before this started, this area was really just known for the nature, beautiful forests, the national park, the bison and the deer and wild animals. Now, we have soldiers everywhere, and helicopters flying over our house.” 

Unnamed woman

“Before this started, this area was really just known for the nature, beautiful forests, the national park, the bison and the deer and wild animals. Now, we have soldiers everywhere, and helicopters flying over our house,” she said.

One night, when she and her father were helping a group of migrants in the forest, a less-sympathetic neighbor called the border guards to take them away.

“They just packed all of them on a big military truck. There were kids there, two little girls. One was maybe 3, the other one 5 or 6. They were sisters. And they were instantly just taken back to the forest with their entire family,” she said. “It was horrible. It was heartbreaking. I was just standing there crying.”

For her, this ancient forest, the oldest in Europe, will never be the same again.

“I can’t walk in the forest without looking for people anymore,” she said. “I always just look around because there might be people hiding there, who need help. I don’t leave my house without a couple of packages of food, water, socks, those necessary things for them to survive.”

In the village of Werestok, Kamil Syller’s house looks out on a big stretch of open field in front of the forest where bison occasionally roam. Months ago, Syller, a local lawyer, started to light a green lantern outside his home to signal that migrants could find help there. And, he keeps a pair of binoculars handy.

Locals near the Belarusian border have lit green lanterns in their homes to signal to migrants that it is a safe place to seek help.

Credit:

Andrew Connelly/The World

“Red is not a good choice. Blue is police. And yellow is just a normal light. So, it was a kind of process of elimination,” he said.

But recently, Syller has had second thoughts about his beacon.

“Yesterday, I saw the border guards’ car lurking outside the village. They probably were hunting migrants who see this light. Maybe it became a trap.”

The forest is disorientating even in the daytime. At one spot a few miles away from Syller’s house, in a small clearing, clothes discarded by migrants lie strewn under the trees along with Belarusian candy wrappers and documents written in Arabic.

Syller, who was monitoring their situation, said that the owners of these clothes were pushed back over the border.

“Our aid network exists because of the illegality of our authorities. We would help the border guards and police happily if they didn’t push people back to Belarus.”

He, too, can never look at the forest in the same way again.

“Our forest was the place we can rest, and now it’s a potential cemetery and a place of stress,” Syller said. “We have no place to escape, physically or mentally. We know somewhere in the woods, there are people.”

How governments finance the ruin of our oceans 

class=”MuiTypography-root-125 MuiTypography-h1-130″>How governments finance the ruin of our oceans 

The World’s Southeast Asia correspondent Patrick Winn spoke with marine bioloigst Dr. Daniel Pauly, asking him what can be done to reverse the crisis around overfishing and creating "dead zones" in the oceans.

The WorldNovember 23, 2021 · 3:45 PM EST

A National Park Service boat navigates the waters in Biscayne National Park, Florida, July 8, 2014. Federal officials are seeking to ban commercial fishing in the park which is offshore from suburban Miami. Officials say cutting off commercial fishing will help improve the numbers and size of fish swimming through the park.

Lynne Sladky/AP

Our oceans were once believed to be an endless source of fish. That has since been proven false — and as absurd as denying climate change.

Yet, different governments around the world, including the United States, not only allow extreme overfishing but actually pay fishing boats to turn the oceans into so-called "dead zones."

The World Trade Organization will discuss banning this at a meeting later this month. Meanwhile, a well-known marine biologist, Daniel Pauly, says the oceans are reaching a tipping point.

The World’s Southeast Asia correspondent, Patrick Winn, spoke with Pauly, asking him what we can do to reverse this crisis.  

Patrick Winn: When we talk about overfishing, that mostly means a type of fishing called trawler fishing. How does it work? Daniel Pauly: Trawling is dragging a net behind a powerful boat. And the dimension of the nets is such that you could put four jumbo jets at the same time in it. Four jumbo jets. So, these nets, they’re dragged on the bottom of the ocean. And everything in their path, they take. This is very different from catching fish with a hook and lines.Right, so it’s really imprecise.Yep, the big fish, the small fish, the medium fish, different species — they all get caught. You reject all the fish you don’t want. So, millions of tons of perfectly good fish is thrown overboard by trawlers all over the world. It can be so extreme as rejecting 90% of your catch. Dead, obviously. Dead into the water. This is an extremely wasteful method of fishing.Your research has shown that trawling creates these “dead zones” in the ocean, with mostly jellyfish floating around. So, what does that mean for trawlers who are still out there trying to scoop up fish?What it means is that the trawler fleets have to go further and further. And they don’t catch much. So, what do you do? You beg your government for subsidies. For lower costs on capital. You get lower costs on fuel. You get lower costs on building and repair, loans and so on. All of these subsidies amount to about a third of the value of the catch.So, following that logic, as we drain the oceans of fish, the trawlers have to get more aggressive, burn more fuel and ask the government for more assistance just to collect the fish that are left?Yes. The fisheries scientists are trying desperately to remove subsidies from big fleets, from big trawlers. Because they are not needed to produce the fish that we want. They are not needed. This is a race to the bottom. It’s completely useless. It’s like global warming. We could do without things that are causing all these problems. But there are lobbies that prevent us from doing so.Around the world, all countries put together give $35 billion a year in subsidies to trawlers. A lot of money. And I see $700 million of that comes from the United States. How big a factor is the US here?The US is not the major subsidizer. The major subsidizers are China, Spain and France and Italy. In Asia, it is China, Japan, Korea. And these subsidies enable fleets to be kept afloat that don’t really earn a net profit.If you took away government money, would the trawler fleets go out of business?Yes, they would go bust. Right away. Right now, the WTO is negotiating about the abolition of subsidies. They will probably not succeed. But if they did, it would have no negative effect on food supply. In the case of trawlers, getting rid of them would enable the other sector of fisheries, especially smaller boats, smaller players, that don’t use so much energy and don’t get subsidies so much.These dead zones in the ocean keep growing and growing. Do you worry it’s too late to reverse this trend?It’s never too late. What would it mean? We give them more subsidies so they can destroy more? It doesn’t make sense. It is always a good thing to do what is right.

This interview has been lightly edited and condensed for clarity.

How the Beatles inspired a rock revolution in Argentina

class=”MuiTypography-root-133 MuiTypography-h1-138″>How the Beatles inspired a rock revolution in Argentina

The birth of Argentine rock coincided with a turbulent time in Latin American history when many countries fell under military dictatorships. 

The WorldNovember 23, 2021 · 3:15 PM EST

Los Gatos live in concert, 1968. 

Diaro21/Wikimedia

Much like in the rest of the world, the Beatles quickly became the most popular band in Argentina in the early 1960s. 

And it didn’t take long before local Latin American musicians began mimicking the Beatles’ sound. 

Argentine teenagers of that generation grew up alongside the Beatles and those formative years were shaped by their music, politics and philosophy.

One of the very first groups to do so was Los Shakers, four lads from Uruguay who decided to form the band after watching the Beatles’ movie, “A Hard Day’s Night.” Their biggest hit, released in 1966, was called “Break It All,” and it was proof that good rock music could be made right there on home soil. 

But Argentine musician Litto Nebbia said there was one thing missing: lyrics locals could understand.

“When people tell me, 'you were one of the first to sing in Spanish,' I think, what other language were we supposed to sing in?” 

Litto Nebbia, member of Los Gatos

“When people tell me, 'You were one of the first to sing in Spanish,' I think, what other language were we supposed to sing in?” he said.

Related: Elvis Costello’s ‘Spanish Model’ brings back rock-and-roll classics to a Spanish-speaking audience

In 1967, Nebbia and his band, Los Gatos, released their first single, “La Balsa.” It was an overnight sensation, becoming the first rock hit in Argentina sung in Spanish. The lyrics explore the urge to escape this “sad and abandoned” world — to gather enough wood to build una balsa, "a raft," and float aimlessly at sea.

“It was this idea from the 1960s where you don’t have to conform to society, you can live however you want,” Nebbia said. 

“La Balsa” became an anthem of sorts for Argentine youth, particularly among middle-class teenagers in Buenos Aires and the surrounding areas. It was often heard at parties and in bars and parks on sunny days. 

The success of Los Gatos as a local rock band that sang in Spanish was followed by the emergence of numerous other bands — such as Manal, Almendra and Arco Iris. It ushered in a whole new era of Argentine music: rock Argentino, or Argentine rock.

Related: How the Beatles created a sense of ‘place’ for this Argentinian American

Los Gatos band, circa 1968. Clockwise from top left: Ciro Fogliatta, Litto Nebbia, Oscar Moro, Kay Galifi and Alfredo Toth.

Credit:

Public Domain/Wikimedia

“Los Gatos were like the first beat band in Argentina,” said Gustavo Santaolalla, lead singer and guitarist of Arco Iris.

“From there, it was really a grassroots thing, that’s how [the popularity of Argentine rock] grew.”

Santaolalla, who is now an Oscar-winning producer and composer based in Los Angeles, said rock Argentino has its own particular sound, often fusing British rock with Latin American folk music. 

His band, Arco Iris, was one of the first in Argentina to experiment with these sounds, using traditional rhythms from the Andes Mountains region and instruments like the siku, a type of pan flute.

“I didn’t want to just write songs that were kind of like Beatles songs but in Spanish. … I wanted to do something that had an identity.”

Gustavo Santaolalla, lead singer and guitarist, Arco Iris

In this March 1, 2013 photo, Argentine recording artist and producer Gustavo Santaolalla poses for a portrait in Los Angeles. 

Credit:

Chris Pizzello/AP/Invision

“I didn’t want to just write songs that were kind of like Beatles songs but in Spanish,” Santaolalla said. “I wanted to do something that had an identity.”

The birth of rock Argentino coincided with a turbulent time in Latin American history when many countries fell under military dictatorships. In Argentina, the military ruled from 1966 to 1973 and again from 1976 to 1983. During both regimes, tens of thousands of people were tortured, killed or “disappeared; military officials claimed they were hunting down political dissidents, but many of the victims were social workers, journalists, students and artists.

“We were somehow persecuted by the government,” Santaolalla said. “The only thing I did was [sic] having long hair and playing an electric guitar and playing in a rock band. I didn’t belong to any political party.”

Related:  The University of Liverpool new master’s makes a whole degree of Beatlemania

Irigoyen & Litto Nebbia perform at the Music Festival Pinap in 1969. 

Credit:

Rubbersoul1950/Wikimedia

Rock music was seen by military leaders as a threat to their regime, so musicians like Santaolalla and Nebbia went into exile in the US and Mexico, respectively.

But they and many other musicians continued to write music and speak out against the human rights violations taking place — through veiled lyrics that were subtle enough to pass censorship laws.

“We provided a sort of refuge for kids to isolate themselves a little bit of what was happening, and at the same time give them hope,” Santaolalla said.

“The young generation took this music as a flag to express their views on the world and on the system and all the injustices.”

He said that using music to question authority stemmed, in part, from the Beatles’ early influence.

“[The Beatles] provided a great service to humankind,” Santaolalla said. “Not only by giving us fantastic music, but also in a way by leading us through these changes that were happening in the world.”

Sudan’s civilian prime minister is reinstated weeks after military takeover

class=”MuiTypography-root-133 MuiTypography-h1-138″>Sudan’s civilian prime minister is reinstated weeks after military takeover

After signing a 14-point deal with the country's military chief, Sudanese Prime Minister Abdulla Hamdok returned to office, promising to adopt a 2019 constitutional agreement.

The WorldNovember 23, 2021 · 2:30 PM EST

Sudan's top general Abdel Fattah al-Burhan and Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok hold documents during a ceremony to reinstate Hamdok, who was deposed in a coup last month, in Khartoum, Sudan, Nov. 21, 2021.

Sudan Transitional Sovereign Council via AP

Nearly a month after he was removed from office and put under house arrest, Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok has been reinstated to his position as the country’s interim civilian leader until it can hold democratic elections.

In Sudan, Hamdok signed a 14-point deal with General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan — the man behind the recent military takeover — to return to office, release political detainees and return to the 2019 constitutional agreement that was meant to steer Sudan toward democracy.

"We must put an end to the bloodshed.”

Abdalla Hamdok, prime minister, Sudan

“I know our people are capable of sacrificing," Hamdok said on Sunday through an interpreter. “But we must put an end to the bloodshed."

According to the Sudan Doctors Committee, more than 40 people have been killed by security forces during the weekslong protests against the military, including a 16-year-old boy who died after security forces shot him in the head.

Hamdok said he signed the agreement to end the violence, but also to put the country’s transition back on track.

“This agreement offers the possibility, because we can preserve the gains of the past two years,” Hamdok said, citing the end of Sudan’s decadeslong international isolation and removal from the US' state sponsors of terror list.

Related: 'Millions March' protests planned across Sudan as military doubles down on power grab

The military takeover last month not only threatened Sudan’s hard-won gains, but also put the country’s hope for a democratic future into question.

Still, the military has maintained they acted for the benefit of Sudan, and have denied the labeling of their actions as a military coup.

“By signing this political action, we were able to establish a real foundation for a transitional period.”

Abdel Fattah al-Burhan, commander-in-chief, Sudanese Armed Forces

“By signing this political action, we were able to establish a real foundation for a transitional period,” said al-Burhan at Sunday’s conference.

Mohamed Hamdan “Hemeti” Dagalo, head of Sudan’s Rapid Support Forces (RSF), wrote on Twitter that these "corrective actions" taken by the military in October to effectively dissolve the transitional government were “absolutely necessary.”

And Kholood Khair of Insight Strategy Partners told The World from Khartoum thatthe military seems to have gotten a leg up over the civilians in that it has been able to craft a new agreement where it still maintains a lot of power and really hasn’t had to give much up.” 

But the military, she said, has proven to be an unreliable partner, as shown by the events of the past month.

By signing the deal, Khair said that Hamdok has become politically weakened, and has faced resounding criticism from the streets and from his own supporters.

Related: Sudan’s ousted ambassador to the US says resorting to ‘the gun’ doesn’t aid the revolution

“This was an agreement that was unilaterally agreed [upon] and unilaterally brokered by the prime minister without the consultation of any civil society group, whether that's political parties or initiatives, organizations or the street itself,” Khair said.

Sunday’s protests in the streets of Khartoum, which previously had called for Hamdok’s release, have now turned against him.

The Sudanese Professionals Association (SPA), an umbrella professional group that was pivotal in Sudan’s 2019 revolution, has rejected the deal.

Hamdok is now also facing opposition from his own ministers.

Related: Sudanese protester to military: ‘Our numbers are too big to be ignored’

“We are against what we saw on the TV, because it is supportive of the coup,” said Sudan’s Foreign Minister Mariam al-Sadig al-Mahdi during a conference held by the Atlantic Council.

She added that she and several other ministers have since submitted their letters of resignation.

Joe Nichols – Hawaii On Me lyrics

Joe Nichols

Hawaii On Me lyrics


Joe Nichols – Hawaii On Me lyrics

Someday when I die, you’re gonna cry
Hopefully I’ll be up on in the sky
Now don’t spent my money on a box and a hole
That might be my body, but that ain’t my soul
Put your feet in the sand, buy you a Coke
Raise it on up, crack a good joke
Dip toes in the water and ashes to sea
Yeah, when I die to Hawaii on me
Have the time of your life, go ahead blow it on out
Have a big party at a big penthouse
Over lookin’ the beach of Waikiki
Yeah, when I die go to Hawaii on me
Put your feet in the sand, buy you a Coke

Raise it on up, crack a good joke
Dip toes in the water and ashes to sea
Yeah, when I die to go Hawaii on me
I made a good livin’, I lived a good life
I raised some great kids, and I loved a great wife
So get on a plane in a first class seat
When I die to go Hawaii on me
Put your feet in the sand, buy you a Coke
Raise it on up, crack a good joke
Dip toes in the water and ashes to sea
When I die to Hawaii on me
Yeah, when I die go to Hawaii on me
I love you dad

Joe Nichols – Hawaii On Me lyrics
lyrics.az

Joe Nichols – Screened In lyrics

Joe Nichols

Screened In lyrics


Joe Nichols – Screened In lyrics

Out here on the screened in
Feels like a 110
That mosquito’s makin a fuss
Mad cause he can’t get to us
Got a shot of clear in my lemonade
Tick tick tick tick goes the fan blade
Pick up that Gibson and play us one
Get this old back porch a feelin right
Half a can between my cheek and gum
Good sign I’m fine where I am
Tonight, just hangin and singin and drinkin
With some good friends
Out on the screened in
Hey I remember back when
It was dad, and mom and them
They knew how to kick it back
We put our own little spin on that
Looks like we’re gonna half to drag out the sofa
Just got a text the girls are on the way over
Pick up that Gibson and play us one

Get this old back porch a feelin right
Half a can between my cheek and gum
Good sign I’m fine where I am
Tonight, just hangin and singin and drinkin
With some good friends
Out on the screened in
Yeah
Yeah, I got a shot of clear in my lemonade
Tick tick tick tick goes the fan blade
Why don’t ya
Pick up that Gibson and play us one
Get this old back porch a feelin right
Half a can between my cheek and gum
Good sign I’m fine where I am
Tonight, just hangin and singin and drinkin
And layin it back and chalxin’ is happen’
With some good friends
Out on the screened in
Out on the screened in

Joe Nichols – Screened In lyrics
lyrics.az

Joywave – Cyn City 2000 lyrics

Joywave

Cyn City 2000 lyrics


Joywave – Cyn City 2000 lyrics

[Verse 1]
The last idea I had got swallowed by a black hole
I could cure cancer but they’d give the prize to some a**hole
[Pre-Chorus]
Wasting time, everybody’s in your mind, yeah you coulda done it first but the fit just wasn’t right
[Chorus]
You’re here, but look at the others
They got more than you, so you need another
You had nothing, then you did the numbers
But if you’d change your view you’d see
There’s nowhere better to be
[Verse 2]
Step outside of the pre-drawn lines I’ve assembled
Help me find a balance in the malice
I don’t wanna be cynical
[Pre-Chorus]
Wasting time, everybody’s in your mind, yeah you coulda done it first but the market wasn’t right

[Chorus]
You’re here, but look at the others
They got more than you, so you need another
You had nothing, then you did the numbers
But if you’d change your view you’d see
There’s nowhere better to be
[Bridge]
I don’t wanna be cynical
I don’t wanna be cynical
I don’t wanna be cynical
I don’t wanna be cynical
I don’t wanna be cynical
I don’t wanna be cynical
I don’t wanna be cynical
I don’t wanna be cynical
I don’t
[Outro]
There’s nowhere better to be, yeah
There’s nowhere better to be, yeah, yeah, yeah
There’s nowhere better to be, yeah
There’s nowhere better to be, yeah, yeah, yeah
There’s nowhere better to be

Joywave – Cyn City 2000 lyrics
lyrics.az